Awareness

English

Delivering hope, promise and support to Canadians living with diabetes

A staggering number of Canadians, 8.4 million, are currently living with diabetes or are at increased risk  of developing the condition during their lifetime. With 2.4 million affected by diabetes and 6 million in a state of ‘pre-diabetes’ – many of whom are unaware that they have impaired glucose tolerance – diabetes is an invisible, potentially deadly pandemic that affects a quarter of the Canadian population.

Education, advocacy, and support for research in Quebec

In this report, Serge Langlois provides information on the mission and objectives of Diabète Québec. Founded in 1954, Diabète Québec currently unites some 30,000 people with diabetes, healthcare professionals and around 50 affiliated associations that serve communities throughout Quebec – comprising a quarter of Canada’s population. The three pillars of Diabète Québec’s mission are to inform, raise awareness and prevent diabetes and its complications.


Turning points in the fight against diabetes

President's editorial

Know the warning signs of diabetes in children - World Diabetes Day 2008

The World Diabetes Day campaign is led by the International Diabetes Federation and its member associations. It is a multiple-stakeholder partnership that includes diabetes organizations and their members around the world and Official World Diabetes Day Partners. Each campaign is centred on a theme that is established by the IDF Executive Board and approved by the World Health Organization. This year sees the second half of a 24-month campaign focussing on diabetes in children and adolescents. The main campaign slogan is ‘Know the warning signs’.

Partnerships and knowledge - the enemies of disease

President's editorial

For children, for change - the Diabetes Youth Charter

Diabetes is a constant and daily challenge for children and adolescents, their parents and carers. Henk-Jan Aanstoot, a paediatric diabetologist, affirms that he is inspired and motivated to see many families dealing well with their condition. Very young children, teenagers and young adults all share the ability to teach him something important every day – about patience, commitment and an unbelievable desire to overcome adversity and to triumph. But there are serious shortcomings in the care afforded to these young people in developed as well as developing countries.

Small-scale strategies to improve diabetes awareness in those who need it most

After only a few hours at an outpatient diabetes clinic in Tanzania, it becomes apparent to any observer that most people with diabetes arrive unaccompanied. The lack of affordable transportation forces people to visit the clinics alone. Unfortunately, such behaviour not only fosters a lack of support from the family but also creates a gap between the family and the healthcare provider. When it comes to managing diabetes at a population level, a team approach is necessary that includes people with diabetes, their family and their healthcare providers.

Beacons of hope

President's editorial

Action on education

President's editorial

Access to care and information

Editorial of the Editor-in-chief

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