Communication

English

A WORLD OF HOPE AND DREAMS

Our Federation is an umbrella organization of over 200 national diabetes associations. They are our Member Associations and represent our global constituency. They are the backbone of the worldwide diabetes community. They work hard and they work well. It is thanks to the evidence on diabetes provided by our Member Associations that the IDF Diabetes Atlas is a respected source of diabetes statistics.

WE SHALL OVERCOME!

Welcome to the first Diabetes Voice of 2012 – our first edition following the very successful IDF World Diabetes Congress in Dubai. Your editorial team were at the Congress, and President Elect Sir Michael Hirst reflects on it in these pages. As he points out, there is a lot of diabetes in the Middle East and North Africa and it is right to take the IDF World Diabetes Congress to such hot spots. I do, of course, refer to the high prevalence of diabetes with this term – although the weather was pretty good too! Raising the profile of diabetes in that region is important.

Shout to the top! YOUNG LEADERS in diabetes find their VOICE

Over 50% of the world’s population is under 30. This group contribute around 5% to the global diabetes population – and their numbers are growing fast. Yet the needs of young people with diabetes often go unnoticed. Older generations overlook youth at our peril. In the words of Kofi Annan, “a society that cuts itself off from its youth severs its lifeline." Given the corrosive effects of inadequately managed diabetes on societies and economies worldwide, the need for diabetes advocacy involving an engaged and informed youth section has never been more important.

A Champion for NCDs: an interview with George Alleyne

Diabetes Voice had the pleasure of speaking with Sir George Alleyne shortly after the UN Department of Public Information/Non-Governmental Organization (DPI/NGO) conference took place in Melbourne between 30 August and 1 September 2010 on the theme Advance Global Health: Achieve the MDGs. Sir George highlighted the central role of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in global health and development in his keynote speech at the close of the event.

This is your IDF - looking back, moving forward

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has led the global diabetes community for 60 years. Founded in Amsterdam, Holland, on 23 September 1950, IDF spent some years in London, UK, before setting up headquarters at its current location in Brussels, Belgium. It has developed into an umbrella organization of around 200 national diabetes associations, representing the interests of the increasing number of people with diabetes and those at risk.

Art beyond therapy: when patients and healthcare providers share the limelight

Healthcare implies sound knowledge in the field of biomedicine, underpinned by evidence-based medicine. There is another fundamental dimension: the healthcare provider-patient relationship. Balint studied the gap between the professional identity of doctors and the reality of patients – an ocean of unspoken messages separates their worlds. The further dimension is that of therapeutic education, the objective of which is to help people to become more autonomous. In these three aspects of healthcare, the relationship between patients and doctors is never even.

Art as a development process for people with a chronic condition

There are various ways to improve people’s capacity to cope with the psychological burden of a chronic condition. A recent programme based on self-expression through painting demonstrated a way of discovering a person’s potential for development and self-efficacy. This report describes the structure and process of a painting workshop programme for people affected by a chronic condition. Attending one or several painting workshops, the participants used the art material to express and give shape to their inner suffering associated with their condition.

Delivering hope, promise and support to Canadians living with diabetes

A staggering number of Canadians, 8.4 million, are currently living with diabetes or are at increased risk  of developing the condition during their lifetime. With 2.4 million affected by diabetes and 6 million in a state of ‘pre-diabetes’ – many of whom are unaware that they have impaired glucose tolerance – diabetes is an invisible, potentially deadly pandemic that affects a quarter of the Canadian population.

Education, advocacy, and support for research in Quebec

In this report, Serge Langlois provides information on the mission and objectives of Diabète Québec. Founded in 1954, Diabète Québec currently unites some 30,000 people with diabetes, healthcare professionals and around 50 affiliated associations that serve communities throughout Quebec – comprising a quarter of Canada’s population. The three pillars of Diabète Québec’s mission are to inform, raise awareness and prevent diabetes and its complications.


Closing the information gap: the HINARI, AGORA and OARE programmes

The lack of access to scientific and medical literature has historically been a major challenge in developing countries. In a world that is increasingly digital, effective opportunities now exist for connecting healthcare providers, researchers and policy-makers with online research and clinical information. The authors report on HINARI, AGORA and OARE programmes built on partnerships between publishers and UN organizations which provide researchers from developing countries with access to the world’s latest scientific literature.

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