Communication

English

IDF communications: 100% online

Since its re-launch in mid 2001, the website of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has increased its user base by more than 1000 new users per month. The statistics tell a positive story: in both October and November 2004, the website attracted more than 60 000 visitors – resulting in more than one million page views over the two months. Over 90% of our publications are now sold through our online bookshop. We believe that the website is fast establishing itself as a significant online service for the global diabetes community.

19th World Diabetes Congress, Cape Town 2006

The 19th World Diabetes Congress, organized by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), will be held in Cape Town, South Africa, on 3-7 December 2006. This conference is special in terms both of its organization and its focus. A combination of in-house congress management and the close involvement of African diabetes organizations will ensure that the conference provides a popular and productive forum for the discussion of a broad range of diabetes issues of local and global relevance. The IDF Congress Unit reports.

A collective voice to inform and inspire

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

Karachi, 2004: Diabetes in Asia

The rising prevalence of diabetes in Asia demands effective strategies to combat and relieve the burden to health posed by this condition – now described as an epidemic. To this end, for the past 5 years the Diabetes in Asia conferences have brought together experts in diabetes-related fields, such as nutrition, nursing, education and endocrinology. These meetings serve to elevate the awareness of diabetes in Asia, promote preventative measures, and improve diabetes care. The fifth Diabetes in Asia conference was held in Karachi, Pakistan this year. Supported

Diabetes-related websites: are they readable?

The Internet has become a useful tool that is relatively easy to operate. With little effort, huge amounts of information can be found about specific health conditions or health in general. Views and concerns about health can be shared with literally millions of other people; spreading health information to people around the world is a simple process. Clearly however, there is a need to evaluate this information

The impact of low health literacy on diabetes outcome

According to the 1993 US National Adult Literacy Survey, approximately 90 million people in the USA have deficiencies in reading or computational skills that prevent them from fully participating in normal daily activities – such as reading a bus schedule or entering background information on an application form. Although the Survey did not evaluate the ability to read and comprehend health-related materials,

Enhancing health communication: the German experience

The recent euphoria surrounding the positive effects of preventative measures with people with impaired glucose tolerance or manifest Type 2 diabetes is rarely reflected in the experience of the health-care professionals working with people with diabetes. Despite efforts to advise and inform, there is very little lasting change in health-care behaviour. Many health-care professionals report feelings of frustration and anger. They often describe the people in their care as 'difficult'.

Empowering children with diabetes and their parents

When a child is diagnosed with diabetes, the news usually comes as a shock to all family members. This often provokes a crisis which is associated with grief and sadness; a complex scenario emerges. Children with diabetes and their parents often feel overwhelmed by the amount of knowledge required to effectively manage the condition. Parents and children experience feelings of guilt. Parents sometimes feel they may have been able to prevent their child's diabetes; children may blame themselves for an illness, and perceive the condition and its treatment as a form of punishment.

Quality communication improving quality of life

The ultimate goal of diabetes care is to enhance the quality of life of people with the condition. Quality of life is increasingly used as a factor in the evaluation of the quality of care. The results of this evaluation are used by health-care providers in order to make recommendations for future care. Only the person receiving care is capable of evaluating their quality of life during and following medical care.

Diabetes attitudes, wishes and needs

The overall objective of Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) is to improve the psycho-social support for people with diabetes. This global Programme is led by Novo Nordisk, in partnership with the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), and an advisory panel of leading diabetes experts. The DAWN activities began with the DAWN Study in 2001. This global investigation into the affective aspects of the condition facilitated comparisons and cross-referencing between the key players in the diabetes community. The key finding was that critical gaps

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