Communication

English

Brazilian website brings together people involved in diabetes

How much time is necessary to learn about the important discoveries on the treament of diabetes? Nowadays, only a couple of minutes. This is the importance of internet to millions of people with diabetes all over the world. The internet has shortened all the distances, opening a new channel of communication.

Delivering the message through effective advocacy

Diabetes is spreading across the world at an epidemic rate. Since making a decision to increase its attention to advocacy in 1994, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has led numerous successful advocacy efforts. Providing information to policy makers is crucial. Nevertheless, even with the economic facts in hand, it remains important to use them in such a way that will bring about governmental action to support research and programmes aimed at conquering diabetes.

www.diabetesonestop.com - worth stopping for

The internet has everything you could wish to know about diabetes. The problem is finding it! Anyone looking for information needs an authoritative site which is fresh, independent, easy to navigate and, most of all, kept up to date. Dr Tony O’Sullivan, Honorary Secretary of the Irish Diabetes Association, took a look at www.diabetesonestop.com of the publishers John Wiley and Sons, UK, to see if it measures up. Dressed in full surfing gear, he cranked up his computer and took to the ether for a look around. This was his verdict.

IDF Europe: unity through diversity

On a sunny weekend in October this year, some 90 representatives of diabetes associations from Scandinavia, the Mediterranean, the European Union, central Europe and former Soviet-block countries gathered in Utrecht, The Netherlands, for the annual European ‘Together We Are Stronger’ meeting. This forum for exchange gave the delegates the unique opportunity to meet in person and share experiences and best practices with fellow diabetes advocates.

Regional highlights 2001: Regional Development Plan shows results

Five years after the introduction of the Regional Development Plan (RDP), which called for basic infrastructure to be put into place, the IDF’s seven Regions are showing the results of this investment. Regional strategic action plans now provide the framework for initiatives to improve the lives of people with diabetes. Developing educational courses strengthening strategic partnerships and improving communications were among the highlights of a very active and productive year

Foundations set for the future

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

Plus ça change...

President's editorial

Atlas puts diabetes on the world map

“The spread of the western diet and couch-potato lifestyle has transformed diabetes, a ‘disease of affluence’ that now affects five percent of adults, into one of the world’s worst and fastest-growing health epidemics.” Financial Times, 6 November 2000. This was the thrust of the message read by thousands of people all over the world on the day the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) launched its first diabetes atlas, Diabetes Atlas 2000.

Seeing it right: accessible information for the visually impaired

Failure to provide accessible information for blind and partially sighted people is both unacceptable and unnecessary. It is unacceptable in that it is a denial of a fundamental right to information. It is unnecessary in that it makes no sense on business grounds. Providing information in alternative formats need not be expensive or difficult; large print, audio tape and computer files can be easily provided without specialist equipment.

Magazines in Africa

A publication that can help inform people with diabetes about their condition and keep them motivated to look after themselves would seem to be a valuable and cost-effective if not essential part of self-management. But in most parts of the poorly resourced continent of Africa, a magazine for people with diabetes is a luxury. Publishing is expensive and requires a supportive economy and a literate population with a common language.

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