Educating the educators: an International Curriculum for Health Professionals in Diabetes

The lack of trained healthcare professionals and of programmes to train them has been cited by many member associations of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) as the most critical issue hindering the delivery of high quality diabetes education and care. To address this, the IDF Consultative Section on Diabetes Education set out to write a curriculum that could be used in all IDF member countries. This goal has now been achieved. Read more for an overview of the most remarkable features of this new publication.

Cost-effective approaches to diabetes care and prevention

Diabetes is one of the most costly diseases ever in both human and economic terms. To reduce today's burden and that on future generations, it is in everyone's interest that cost-effective measures to prevent diabetes are identified and implemented. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Task Force on Diabetes Health Economics has just completed a review of the evidence on cost-effective approaches to diabetes care and prevention. The timely publication shows that investment in diabetes care can be a cost-effective use of scarce resources. This article provides a brief summary.

Diabetes and kidney disease: a report from NephroAsia 2004

The global burden of chronic kidney failure (end stage renal disease) is primarily driven by the current parallel rise in the prevalence of diabetes and high blood pressure (hypertension). Asia, which has more than 60% of the world’s population, is at the forefront of this global epidemic of diabetes and kidney disease. Juliana Chan offers some background on the current status of care for kidney disease and reports on the NephroAsia 2004 meeting in Singapore.

Thinking big to raise awareness in India: the mega diabetes show

According to World Health Organization (WHO) figures, 23 million people in India have diabetes, more than in any other country in the world. By 2025, this number is expected to increase to over 57 million. In other words, one in seven people in India will have diabetes. The increasing prevalence of diabetes seen throughout Asia is a reflection of the effects of westernization, urbanization, and mechanization, all of which are associated with a sedentary life style. Diabetes requires life-long treatment and impacts upon people's daily lives. It carries the risk of chronic complications.

International Diabetes Youth Ambassadors: dreaming, learning, doing

'Dreaming, learning, doing' is the inspirational slogan of the International Diabetes Youth Ambassadors (IDYA). As the former National Youth Advocate for the American Diabetes Association (ADA), Clare Rosenfeld received a multitude of e-mails from young people with diabetes around the world. Some asked for assistance; others for education. All of them shared a dream of one day seeing a cure for diabetes. This dream led Clare to contact Children with Diabetes (CWD), in the hope of creating a global programme to unite these young people.

Diabetes Action Now: WHO and IDF working together to raise awareness worldwide

Even among policy makers at an international and national level, awareness about the public health and clinical importance of diabetes remains low. Diabetes is widely perceived as a condition of low importance to the poorer populations in the world. In the low- and middle-income countries, the impact of diabetes is largely unrecognized. Yet the world is facing a dramatic rise in diabetes prevalence, most of which will occur in the low- and middle-income countries.

Composing a new IDF triennium: the beat goes on

President's editorial

Virtual conferencing technology: tomorrow's world congress?

In 2006, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) will hold its 19th World Diabetes Congress. The congress will be organized from the Congress Unit located in the IDF Executive Office in Brussels. A lead time of more than 3 years seems very comfortable. However, the role of technology in the organization of congresses is growing. To properly prepare for the event, we must keep up with the latest developments and anticipate that some of them – however ridiculously far fetched they seem today – may become a reality in just a few years time.

Better product information: is direct advertising the answer?

In the last few years, there has been an important but little-publicized

A new Diabetes Atlas: new data, new hope

"More than 300 million people world wide are at risk of developing diabetes, and the disease's economic impact in some hard-hit countries could be higher than that of the AIDS pandemic, diabetes experts warned." Reuters, 25 August 2003. This was the thrust of an article which was read by people all over the world on the day on which the second edition of the Diabetes Atlas was launched by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF).