Developing countries


Diabetes care model in a lower middle-income country: Bangladesh

In developing countries there is lack of organized care for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) like diabetes, hypertension, stroke, and pulmonary disease, even though these diseases have become the leading cause of death in the world. Like so many developing countries, the prevalence of diabetes in Bangladesh is on the rise and was estimated at 7.4% by IDFs Diabetes Atlas in 2015.

Type 1 diabetes paediatric care challenge in Bolivia

Children and young people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Bolivia, a country situated in the heart of South America, have limited access to care, insulin, and supplies including glucometers, test strips, and syringes for injecting insulin.

Diabetic Foot Disease: When the alarm to action is missing

Did you know that every 20 seconds an amputation caused by diabetes occurs somewhere in the world? Paradoxically 85 percent of all amputations caused by diabetes are preventable. If amputation is almost always preventable then this is good news for people at greatest risk for diabetic foot disease. Sadly, amputations are still occurring at too great a rate in high, low- and middle-income countries.

Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) in resource limited settings

Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) is a relatively new technology which has the potential to assist people living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and treated with insulin to achieve the goal of optimum control of blood glucose.

The double burden of diabetes and TB - experience in India

At present, India is facing a dual epidemic of diabetes and tuberculosis (TB). In 2013, there were an estimated 65.1 million people with diabetes and the number is projected to rise to 109 million in 2035.1 Today it is estimated that 80% of all diabetes cases occur in low- and middle-income countries. People with diabetes (type 1 or type 2 diabetes) are at higher risk of contracting TB.

IDF and BRIDGES span the globe to tackle diabetes

Translational research helps to apply successful outcomes from basic science into practical real-life applications in communities. Today, this type of research is gaining widespread attention in the prevention and treatment of diabetes.

Motivating better diabetes self-care with SMS text messaging

Good self-management is crucial for experiencing a healthy life with diabetes. Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) and Diabetes Self-Management Support (DSMS) activities provide a process for people living with diabetes to gain the knowledge and skills needed to modify their behaviour. DSME and DSMS also help people with diabetes self-manage the disease and related conditions.

Education to change the course of diabetes in the Caribbean

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimates that over 382 million people currently live with diabetes globally. This accounts for 11% of the adult population and is projected to increase to near 592 million by 2035. The data reveals that over 80% of persons living with diabetes are from developing countries.

Diabetes care in Rwanda - against all odds


Testing the limits - the double burden of diabetes and disaster