Developing countries

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IDF and BRIDGES span the globe to tackle diabetes

Translational research helps to apply successful outcomes from basic science into practical real-life applications in communities. Today, this type of research is gaining widespread attention in the prevention and treatment of diabetes.

Motivating better diabetes self-care with SMS text messaging

Good self-management is crucial for experiencing a healthy life with diabetes. Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) and Diabetes Self-Management Support (DSMS) activities provide a process for people living with diabetes to gain the knowledge and skills needed to modify their behaviour. DSME and DSMS also help people with diabetes self-manage the disease and related conditions.

Education to change the course of diabetes in the Caribbean

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimates that over 382 million people currently live with diabetes globally. This accounts for 11% of the adult population and is projected to increase to near 592 million by 2035. The data reveals that over 80% of persons living with diabetes are from developing countries.

Diabetes care in Rwanda - against all odds


 

Testing the limits - the double burden of diabetes and disaster

 

Addressing the challenge of GDM in the developing world - perspectives from rural western Kenya

IDF Diabetes Atlas reveals high burden of hyperglycaemia in pregnancy

Hyperglycaemia is one of the most prevalent metabolic disorders occurring during pregnancy. It can be a result of either existing diabetes in a pregnant woman or the development of insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia during pregnancy.

Protecting kids’ rights: IDF and select partners launch Kids and Diabetes in Schools (KIDS) project in Brazil and India

 

Anne Belton and Bénédicte Pansier

Children and diabetes: success and challenge in the developing world

Graham Ogle, Angie Middlehurst and Robyn Short-Hobbs

Voices of type 1 diabetes: taking type 1 diabetes to school

Taking type 1 diabetes to school is the subject of the second instalment for our Voices of type 1 diabetes series which features first person accounts of people living with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes and their perspectives on managing the conditions in our world today.

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