Developing countries

English

Why health matters to human development

Helen Clark, Administrator of the UN Development Programme, reflects on the development agenda post-2015 and explains how better prevention and care of Non-communicable Diseases fit into her vision for a broader development goal thereby decreasing the threat NCDs pose to progress.

Gestational diabetes – an update from India

In recent decades, more women of a reproductive age have diabetes, and more pregnancies are complicated by pre-existing diabetes especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Also of concern is gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) - the type of diabetes that is first recognized during pregnancy and affects up to 15% of women worldwide.


A medical student with type 1 diabetes in Mali

Bakary Coulibaly was born in 1984 in Mogola, a rural region of Mali. His father, who died a year after Bakary’s birth, was a farmer and his mother, a life-long homebuilder, who now lives in Touba in the southwest of the country. Despite facing many daunting socioeconomic challenges, Bakary continues to cover ground on the way to achieving his ambition: to become an expert in all aspects of diabetes and share his knowledge to the benefit of others. In this frank and courageous account, he describes his journey with diabetes.


Haiti fights for a brighter future

The devastating earthquake that struck Haiti on 12 January 2010 killed over 200,000 people and left more than 1.5 million homeless. Two years later, more than half a million people still live in tents in relief camps and 50% of the rubble is yet to be removed. The earthquake exposed infrastructural weaknesses and institutional shortcomings. Haiti is struggling with reconstruction efforts that, according to the authors of this report, have been hampered by political paralysis and the lack of coordination in international aid.

Civil society facing down the diabetes emergency in Mali

Santé Diabète emerged in response to a double emergency: the lack of access to care for people with diabetes in Africa and the lack of recognition on the part of the development actors that this is even a problem. Santé Diabète’s overarching objective is to improve the prevention and management of diabetes in Africa. Founded in 2001, it was the first international development-focused NGO to concentrate on the fight against diabetes.


IDF and the global NCD alliance: united for health and development

Non-communicable diseases, including diabetes, heart disease and cancers, cause 8 million premature deaths every year in low- and middle-income countries. The World Health Organization estimates that global deaths from these diseases will continue to rise over the next 10 years, with the African region expected to see the highest relative increase (27%). An increasing body of evidence shows that the human and financial impact of disease is undermining the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

Globalization and the dual burden in sub-Saharan Africa

In sub-Saharan Africa, infectious diseases still cause the majority (69%) of deaths; chronic non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease and cancers, contribute around 25%. But this picture is changing as sub-Saharan Africa undergoes an epidemiological transition with a rapidly increasing chronic non-communicable disease burden.

D-START: supporting innovative translational research projects in developing countries

In the three years since its inception and after two initial rounds of funding, the International Diabetes Federation’s BRIDGES programme has become one of the principal funding initiatives in diabetes worldwide. With the recent announcement of its third round of funding, BRIDGES has consolidated its position in the fast-developing and innovative sector of translational research.

Making a difference to global diabetes

President's editorial

Against the worldwide epidemic

Editor-in-chief's editorial

Pages