Developing countries


Migration and diabetes: the emerging challenge

Diabetes is affecting more and more people every year. In the last decade, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes of one kind or another increased by almost 50%. By the year 2025, more than 300 million people around the world could have been diagnosed with the condition. Many others who have diabetes will not have been diagnosed. Diabetes also represents a major threat to the health of the world’s millions of migrants, who appear to be at greater risk of developing diabetes than non-migrants. Manuel Carballo and Frederik Siem report.

Answering the urgent need for diabetes care personnel in northern India

Nobody can single-handedly manage the many and diverse aspects of diabetes. To be effective, diabetes care requires the coordinated input of people with diabetes and a range of healthcare providers, including a diabetes nurse, dietician, psychologist, pharmacist, physiotherapist or podiatrist, among others. Close

The metabolic syndrome in developing countries

The occurrence of the metabolic syndrome in various ethnic groups – including Caucasians, Africans, Latin Americans, Asian Indians, Chinese, Aboriginal Australians, Polynesians and Micronesians – has been confirmed in

Appropriate footwear: sandals or shoes?

From the moment they are diagnosed with the condition, people with diabetes receive all kinds of advice – or at least they should – ideally from others with the condition or family members who are ‘experts’ in living with diabetes, and professional health-care providers. Of all of these recommendations, one that is often misinterpreted is that relating to ‘appropriate footwear’. The key to this lies in the word ‘appropriate’.

Diabetes care and prevention in Iran

The world is facing a dramatic rise in diabetes prevalence, most of which is occurring in the low- and middle-income countries; it is projected that by 2025, more than 75% of people with diabetes will live in developing countries. This is having a major impact on the quality of life of hundreds of millions people and their families. Furthermore, the negative effects of the obesity-driven diabetes pandemic are being felt in the economy of those countries that are in most need of development.

Large-scale diabetes awareness and prevention in South India

Diabetes has become a major health problem in developing countries, where non-communicable conditions are rapidly overtaking communicable diseases as the most common cause of death. Recent World Health Organization (WHO)

Diabetes foot damage in developing countries: the urgent need for education

Figures released by the International Diabetes Federation suggest that worldwide in 2003 there were almost 200 million people with diabetes – a global prevalence of 5.1%. The report predicted that over the coming decade, the greatest increases in the numbers of people with the condition will occur in Africa and Asia, provoking hugely increased rates of death and disability. Diabetes foot complications constitute a major public health problem, particularly for people with diabetes in developing countries. In this article, Zulfiqarali Abbas and Stephan Morbach look

Religion, politics and the diabetic foot in Senegal

Sixty seven-year-old Venerable Karamogo is the spiritual and community leader of a village in the South of Senegal. About nine years after Karamogo was diagnosed with diabetes, a chronic infection developed in his left leg. The surgeons recommended amputation; but this advice was firmly rejected by Karamogo and his family.

Diabetes Action Now: putting diabetes on the international agenda

Diabetes Action Now, a joint initiative of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the World Health Organization (WHO), aims to stimulate action to address the growing burden of diabetes, especially in low- and middle-income countries and communities. The programme, based at the World Health Organization offices in Geneva, Switzerland, is supported by WHO funds and a grant from the World Diabetes Foundation. As reported previously in Diabetes Voice, Diabetes Action

Therapeutic diabetes education: the Cuban experience

Cuba is a small island country in the Caribbean with 11 million inhabitants. As in other countries, diabetes is a major challenge to health in Cuba. In order to reduce the health and economic impact of diabetes and improve the quality of life of people with the condition, a country-wide diabetes education programme began development over 30 years ago, linking and promoting optimum care and education. Rosario García and Rolando Suárez report on the achievements of the programme and highlight the central role of diabetes education over three decades of care initiatives in Cuba.