Developing countries

English

Appropriate footwear: sandals or shoes?

From the moment they are diagnosed with the condition, people with diabetes receive all kinds of advice – or at least they should – ideally from others with the condition or family members who are ‘experts’ in living with diabetes, and professional health-care providers. Of all of these recommendations, one that is often misinterpreted is that relating to ‘appropriate footwear’. The key to this lies in the word ‘appropriate’.

Diabetes care and prevention in Iran

The world is facing a dramatic rise in diabetes prevalence, most of which is occurring in the low- and middle-income countries; it is projected that by 2025, more than 75% of people with diabetes will live in developing countries. This is having a major impact on the quality of life of hundreds of millions people and their families. Furthermore, the negative effects of the obesity-driven diabetes pandemic are being felt in the economy of those countries that are in most need of development.

Large-scale diabetes awareness and prevention in South India

Diabetes has become a major health problem in developing countries, where non-communicable conditions are rapidly overtaking communicable diseases as the most common cause of death. Recent World Health Organization (WHO)

Diabetes foot damage in developing countries: the urgent need for education

Figures released by the International Diabetes Federation suggest that worldwide in 2003 there were almost 200 million people with diabetes – a global prevalence of 5.1%. The report predicted that over the coming decade, the greatest increases in the numbers of people with the condition will occur in Africa and Asia, provoking hugely increased rates of death and disability. Diabetes foot complications constitute a major public health problem, particularly for people with diabetes in developing countries. In this article, Zulfiqarali Abbas and Stephan Morbach look

Religion, politics and the diabetic foot in Senegal

Sixty seven-year-old Venerable Karamogo is the spiritual and community leader of a village in the South of Senegal. About nine years after Karamogo was diagnosed with diabetes, a chronic infection developed in his left leg. The surgeons recommended amputation; but this advice was firmly rejected by Karamogo and his family.

Diabetes Action Now: putting diabetes on the international agenda

Diabetes Action Now, a joint initiative of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the World Health Organization (WHO), aims to stimulate action to address the growing burden of diabetes, especially in low- and middle-income countries and communities. The programme, based at the World Health Organization offices in Geneva, Switzerland, is supported by WHO funds and a grant from the World Diabetes Foundation. As reported previously in Diabetes Voice, Diabetes Action

Therapeutic diabetes education: the Cuban experience

Cuba is a small island country in the Caribbean with 11 million inhabitants. As in other countries, diabetes is a major challenge to health in Cuba. In order to reduce the health and economic impact of diabetes and improve the quality of life of people with the condition, a country-wide diabetes education programme began development over 30 years ago, linking and promoting optimum care and education. Rosario García and Rolando Suárez report on the achievements of the programme and highlight the central role of diabetes education over three decades of care initiatives in Cuba.

Diabetes education in Africa: what we need to know

Education is the cornerstone of diabetes care and management. Yet while many health-care professionals subscribe to this idea, it is not applied universally. In developing countries in particular, much work remains to be done in order to improve the content, structure and provision of diabetes education. Margueritte de Clerck looks at education needs in Africa and makes some recommendations on the role and responsibilities of fellow health-care professionals, particularly those who work in low-income countries.

The impact of the 2006 World Diabetes Congress on South Africa

There is great significance in choosing an African venue to host the coming International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Congress: the problems encountered by people with diabetes in Africa closely reflect those experienced by people with the condition in much of the rest of the developing world. While people with diabetes in many developed countries – with free access to an increasing range of modern diabetes supplies and analogue human insulins – strive for excellence

Diabetes care in China: meeting the challenge

In both human and economic terms, diabetes is becoming one of the most serious and costly health conditions worldwide. Economic development, bringing changes from a traditional to a modernized lifestyle, is driving a huge increase in the number of people with obesity-related type 2 diabetes in China. The extraordinary size of the problem is worrying; if current trends continue, diabetes will become a massive health burden in China. In this article, Changyu Pan looks at the status of diabetes care in China and highlights the need for regional and national initiatives to

Pages