Developing countries

English

Diabetes education in Africa: what we need to know

Education is the cornerstone of diabetes care and management. Yet while many health-care professionals subscribe to this idea, it is not applied universally. In developing countries in particular, much work remains to be done in order to improve the content, structure and provision of diabetes education. Margueritte de Clerck looks at education needs in Africa and makes some recommendations on the role and responsibilities of fellow health-care professionals, particularly those who work in low-income countries.

The impact of the 2006 World Diabetes Congress on South Africa

There is great significance in choosing an African venue to host the coming International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Congress: the problems encountered by people with diabetes in Africa closely reflect those experienced by people with the condition in much of the rest of the developing world. While people with diabetes in many developed countries – with free access to an increasing range of modern diabetes supplies and analogue human insulins – strive for excellence

Diabetes care in China: meeting the challenge

In both human and economic terms, diabetes is becoming one of the most serious and costly health conditions worldwide. Economic development, bringing changes from a traditional to a modernized lifestyle, is driving a huge increase in the number of people with obesity-related type 2 diabetes in China. The extraordinary size of the problem is worrying; if current trends continue, diabetes will become a massive health burden in China. In this article, Changyu Pan looks at the status of diabetes care in China and highlights the need for regional and national initiatives to

Steps in the right direction

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

New world leaders

President's editorial

The global health and economic impact of tobacco

Tobacco kills half of its regular users, exacts a considerable toll in terms of disease, disability and suffering, and has a profoundly negative impact on family incomes and national economies. In this article, Derek Yach emphasizes the size of these impacts globally and in particular in China.

Restoring diabetes care in Rwanda: the need for effective partnerships

In 1994, more than one million people died in Rwanda in one of the worst genocides in modern times. Rwandan society, at all levels including healthcare, continues to count the human and financial costs of the tragedy – a burden which is compounded by the debilitating scarcity of resources in the nation as a whole. Most of Rwanda’s 8 200 000 inhabitants are united by poverty: according to figures published by the World Bank, the yearly per capita income in Rwanda is 220 USD.

Focus on the people

President's editorial

Socio-economic determinants of the costs of diabetes in India

Diabetes is rapidly emerging as a major health-care problem in India, especially in urban areas where the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes has been reported as 12% of the adult population. Furthermore, there is an equally large pool of people with

Diabetes under fire

In the last issue of Diabetes Voice Panagiotis Tsapogas presented a view of diabetes care in Gaza from the perspective of his work with Médecins Sans Frontières. Here, Itamar Raz, President of the Israel Diabetes Association (IDA), presents a view from the perspective of an Israeli person living in the region, and from the leading Palestinian physicians with whom he collaborates. Together they struggle in the midst of the disruptions to deliver diabetes health care across the

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