Developing countries


The human perspective on health-care reform: coping with diabetes in Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan is a small mountainous country with a predominantly agricultural economy; it gained independence with the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991. For a significant sector of the Kyrgyzstani population, economic difficulties at national level translate into high unemployment and widespread impoverishment. Kyrgyzstan inherited an extensive but basic health-care system, with a functioning – albeit fragmented – structure for managing chronic diseases.

Cost and availability of insulin and other diabetes supplies: IDF survey 2002-2003

Insulin is a life-sustaining medication and as such has been designated an ‘essential drug’ by the World Health Organization (WHO). Insulin therefore should be universally available to everyone who requires it for survival. However, accessibility to the drug is often not secure. This results in life-threatening complications for people who depend on insulin for survival. The authors of this article, in reporting on the results of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) survey, 2002-2003, make a call for improvements to the pricing and availability

Diabetes care in need

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

Diabetes in times of crisis

President's editorial

Plans to stop animal insulin production. Bad news for developing countries

For the West, the availability of animal insulin is a question of freedom of choice. However, it is the only way of survival for a number of people with diabetes in the developing world. Will the plea for help from the people with diabetes in the developing countries, in search of life, go unnoticed, unheard?

Turkey responds to St Vincent

In Anatolia, the quality of diabetes care is generally lower than in the rest of Turkey. Half the people with diabetes living in this region are not aware of their condition. Neither are many on any treatment. Since last year, prompted by the aims of the St Vincent Declaration, the South-eastern Anatolia Diabetes Project (GAPDIAB) has been in operation in response to this situation.

Latest studies clarify state of health in Bahrain

For the past few decades, the Government of Bahrain has been consistently and conscientiously updating the country’s healthcare system, endeavouring to keep up with the demands placed upon it. Luckily so, because, in 1994 it was found that the figures they had been dealing with were way off track. In 1989, a Committee for Primary Care was formed by the Government of Bahrain’s Ministry of Health, standardizing care through establishing rules and regulations to guide physicians treating people with diabetes.

Sponsor a child and save a life

Families of children with diabetes in developing countries are facing an impossible situation. In these regions, the full cost of managing a child with this condition is higher than the average total annual income. Consequently, children with diabetes frequently die quickly. To help alleviate this situation, IDF has commenced a sponsorship programme aiming to support children with diabetes in developing countries. The programme, Life for a Child, was launched at the 17th IDF Congress in Mexico City in November last year.

Epidemiological studies lay the ground for Syrian diabetes campaign

As in many countries of the world, Syria, with its 16 million inhabitants, has witnessed a tremendous change in food habits and lifestyle within the last few decades. This has been reflected in the rise of metabolic diseases in general and diabetes in particular. Three studies have shown that the prevalence of diabetes in Syria is probably higher than published reports have claimed. One of the aims of the Syrian National Diabetes Programme, adopted in 1995, was to assess the national situation by carrying out epidemiological studies.

Diabetes efforts with limited resources in Tanzania

The Tanzania Diabetes Association, established in 1985, is playing a crucial role in providing people in this extremely impoverished country with essential diabetes care. What, at the outset, may have seemed nearly impossible through a lack of funds, has, nevertheless, come into being through a well organized strategy and clear objectives.