Developing countries

English

Diabetes education and empowerment: a role for youth

In 1996, American Youth Understanding Diabetes Abroad (AYUDA) was set up by two teenagers after they had witnessed the economic and emotional hardships faced by José Gabriel and other young people living with diabetes in Latin America.They envisioned a youth-led organization that would educate young people with diabetes about diabetes issues, and help empower them to work effectively for positive change. AYUDA is now a growing organization, which campaigns to raise diabetes awareness and promote sustainable development for diabetes communities throughout the world.

Primary care in Tunisia: improving diabetes management

Tunisia, like most countries of the world, is experiencing an alarming rise in the number of people with diabetes: the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in adults over 30 year of age rose from 4.2% in 1976 to 10% in 1995. In response, the Tunisian Ministry of Public Health have developed a National Programme of diabetes and high blood pressure (hypertension) management in primary care. Initially introduced in 1993, the Programme was then implemented throughout the country in 1998.

Why developing countries need access to cheap treatments for diabetes

There is still a widespread misconception that non-communicable diseases such as diabetes are not relevant to poor people in developing countries. For these people, medicines for the treatment of such conditions are regarded almost as a luxury. Scientific evidence testifies to the contrary. Non-communicable diseases such as diabetes are escalating in developing countries. This is giving rise to severe economic as well as human consequences. An effective public health strategy for poor countries requires continued access to low-cost, high-quality generic medicines.

Deaths from diabetes

Editor-in-chief's editorial

IDF child sponsorship: life for a child with diabetes

For a family in a developing country, having a child diagnosed with diabetes can bring an overwhelming financial burden, and often ends in heartbreak. The IDF Child Sponsorship Programme, Life for a child with diabetes was established to help meet the medical needs of children with diabetes in developing countries, their families, and those who care for them. The Programme provides support to children's diabetes centres in developing countries, so that best practice care for that country can be provided to children from even the poorest situations.

To promote diabetes care, prevention and a cure worldwide

President's editorial

Access to diabetes care in northern Ethiopia

Ethiopia is a mountainous and beautiful country. The capital city, Addis Abba, is about 2500 m (8000 ft) above sea level. Around 85% of the people are farmers who live in circular thatched huts called tukuls. These are grouped into small villages which are often remote and inaccessible. While unpaved roads link the main centres, many areas can be reached only by footpaths. Road transport is either by bus or taxi, both relatively expensive; or by mule or on foot, which are laborious and slow.

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