Developing countries

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Promoting foot care education in developing countries: the Caribbean Diabetic Foot Care Programme

There are 285 million people living with diabetes worldwide, the number of affected people is predicted to reach 438 million by 2030. Because of the rapid increase in diabetes prevalence, the number of diabetes complications is rising equally quickly. Amputation is one of the most feared of these complications. People with diabetes are at risk for nerve damage and problems with the supply of blood to their feet. Nerve damage results in a reduced ability to feel pain and, as a consequence, injuries often go unnoticed. Moreover, poor blood supply can slow down the process of wound healing.


Access to insulin and barriers to care: results of the RAPIA in Vietnam

Access to diabetes care in many countries is problematic due to a variety of factors. These can range from the cost of medication to the distance that people with diabetes need to travel to access a trained healthcare provider. Without adequate access to medication and care, people with diabetes face complications and early death. The authors report on an evaluation of the provision of care and supplies for people with diabetes in Vietnam.

 


A multidisciplinary effort to improve the quality of chronic disease care

Although chronic diseases are leading causes of death and disability, they are neglected elements of the global health agenda. Of all deaths worldwide in 2005, 60% were caused by chronic diseases – principally cardiovascular diseases and diabetes (32%), cancer (13%), and chronic respiratory diseases (7%). Because the increase in chronic diseases is underappreciated, and their economic impact underestimated, many countries take little interest in their prevention, and leave the responsibility for management to individuals.


Challenges to diabetes self-management in developing countries

In developing countries, financial and human resources are limited despite serious needs and multiple health challenges. More than three-quarters of the people with diabetes worldwide live in developing countries. Between 2000 and 2025, the rise in the number of people with the condition in these countries will be around 170%. In  the developing world, diabetes, like other chronic diseases, is often ignored in terms of healthcare priorities; the focus remains largely on immediate and acute care rather than on prevention.

Time to start making good health sense

President's editorial

Here's to celebrations

Editor-in-chief's editorial

Improving access to education and care in Cambodia

Four years ago, when Cambodia’s first diabetes surveys were analysed, they surprised everyone: there were twice as many people with diabetes than had been expected – more than 250,000 people. However, the major donors supporting the country’s healthcare sector continue to distribute financial support in unequal shares.

Agents for change: champions in the fight against diabetes in South Africa

The potential threat from type 2 diabetes in  South Africa remains dangerously underestimated and its current prevalence widely unrecognized. Yet the problem is growing at an alarming rate. A series of factors that are particular to the region represent enormous obstacles to an effective response by people with the condition, healthcare providers and wider society. In this article, Noy Pullen identifies some of the key socio-economic, environmental and educational issues affecting rural South Africa.

The fattening rooms of Calabar - a breeding ground for diabesity

Calabar is the capital city of Cross River State of Nigeria. It is a cosmopolitan town with a population of about half a million people. The population of Cross River State stands at around 2.5 million. Inhabitants of the region are mostly farmers, fishermen and civil servants. The Efik in south Calabar are a proud people with a rich cultural heritage. In Efik communities, the preservation of centuries-old values and customs is central to the tradition of ‘fattening rooms’.

Abject poverty, major difficulties and tragic outcomes in Cambodia

When her doctor diagnosed her with type 2 diabetes in 1997, it was shocking news to Sokhann. For more than a decade, she lived with her condition without any treatment, education or follow-up.

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