Developing countries

English

The extraordinary challenges faced by young people with diabetes in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Diabetes in young people is a heavy burden all over the world but it is particularly severe in developing countries. Although the condition is the same, the context can be very different. Young people with diabetes in the Democratic Republic of Congo have to face a number of major challenges. They are perceived as having a ‘mysterious disease’ which requires a lot of attention on a daily basis throughout a lifetime. Belief in spells is quite common in Africa, and many families feel it is their responsibility to find the person responsible for causing the diabetes.

Addressing the daily problems of children and adolescents in South Africa

In South Africa, managing diabetes in children and adolescents can be especially challenging. South Africa is a country of great socio-economic and ethnic diversity, where healthcare, like culture, languages and customs, varies significantly from one area to another. Furthermore, access to healthcare depends on affordability and availability, ranging in quality between developed- and developing-world standards. With these challenges in mind, the DAWN Youth South Africa survey was undertaken to evaluate the effects of diabetes on young people with the condition and their  family.

Promoting opportunities, fighting against isolation in India

India is undergoing an economic transformation – a financial boom according to many. Among India’s strong points contributing to this positive economic climate is its enormous young population. The potential for productivity, savings and investments by this generation will increase in the future, and is driving up levels of investments and confidence in the Indian economy. However, such gains are cancelled out to a large degree by excessive healthcare spending.

Improvements in care for people with diabetes in Mozambique

An article in this magazine in March 2004 described the Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access in Mozambique, and some of the results from its implementation. Since it was carried out in 2003, much has changed in Mozambique with regards to access to insulin and diabetes care. The Protocol provided vital information on the areas that the healthcare system needed to focus upon in order to improve care.

Improving care and prevention for people with diabetes in Algeria

Like many other developing countries, Algeria is undergoing a transition in its disease  profile. The emergence of non-communicable diseases, including obesity-driven type 2

Partnerships and knowledge - the enemies of disease

President's editorial

Chronic diseases: a growing problem in developing countries

Chronic diseases are increasing in global prevalence and seriously threaten developing nations’ ability to improve the health of their populations. Indeed, chronic disease has become the dominant health burden in many developing countries. It is estimated that in 2005, chronic diseases were responsible for 50% of deaths and illness in 23 selected developing countries. Surveys from countries in all corners of the world reveal significant health and economic consequences from chronic diseases, with the greatest impact likely to occur in the poor countries that are least able to respond.

The CARMEN initiative - Latin America's response to the chronic disease burden

In most countries in the Americas, chronic diseases are now the leading cause of premature death and disability. Responsible for two of every three deaths among the general population, chronic diseases caused almost half of the mortality in people under 70 years old in 2002. The significant socio-economic inequities in Latin America compound the burden of chronic disease (including early death) among poorer people, locking many into a cycle of deprivation and ill-health.

Pakistan's action plan on chronic diseases - public-private partnership in action

About a decade and a half ago, public health priorities in low- and middle-income countries were centred on infectious diseases and maternal and child health issues. Subsequently, however, data published in leading medical journals and reports by multilateral agencies has shown that more than 50% of the burden of disease in developing countries is attributable to chronic diseases – including heart disease, diabetes, cancers and some chronic lung conditions.

Closing the information gap: the HINARI, AGORA and OARE programmes

The lack of access to scientific and medical literature has historically been a major challenge in developing countries. In a world that is increasingly digital, effective opportunities now exist for connecting healthcare providers, researchers and policy-makers with online research and clinical information. The authors report on HINARI, AGORA and OARE programmes built on partnerships between publishers and UN organizations which provide researchers from developing countries with access to the world’s latest scientific literature.

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