Developing countries


Diabetes and traditional medicine in Africa

In Africa, there is said to be one traditional healer to every 200 people; an estimated 80% of people in the continent turn to traditional medicine as a source of primary care, including those with diabetes. In settings that are characterized by shortcomings in healthcare provision resources, traditional healers are making selective use of biomedical knowledge and language to enhance the perceived effectiveness of their treatments.

From research to policy: the development of a national diabetes programme in Cameroon

Ten years ago, without evidence to suggest otherwise, diabetes was not considered a public priority in Cameroon; the emphasis of Government health policy was on tackling the HIV/AIDS epidemic and attempting to eradicate communicable diseases. Efforts had been made to set up centres specializing in diabetes and hypertension, but without the backing of a national diabetes programme, most of these closed within a few years. The lack of data on non-communicable diseases constituted a major roadblock to the development of any such programme.

Toward a better future in Morocco

The rise in the number of people with diabetes in Morocco reflects current global trends. In step with the sharp and ongoing increase in levels of obesity in the urban populations, the prevalence of diabetes is rising. But while the threat of a full-blown diabetes epidemic in Morocco is growing, many people with the condition receive inadequate care as a result of shortages in human and medical resources, poor clinical facilities, and a lack of diabetes education.

Diabetes care in Sudan: emerging issues and acute needs

Sudan is the largest country in Africa and one of the poorest in the world. Its population is estimated at around 37 million; the capital Khartoum, with approximately 6 million inhabitants, is growing rapidly. There are hundreds of ethnic and tribal divisions and language groups within the two distinct major cultures in Sudan – Arabs with Nubian roots and non-Arab Black Africans. The lack of effective collaboration among these groups continues to be a serious problem.

A diabetes strategy for Africa: investing in health, protecting our people

The burgeoning epidemic of diabetes in Africa will exact a terrible toll from the people and economies of the region. The costs of the condition and its complications are already unacceptably high. Every day in Africa, large numbers of children and adults die because they cannot pay for the insulin they need to survive; many more die before a diagnosis can be made. But diabetes can be controlled through relatively small investments and prevented entirely through simple cost-effective interventions.

Our time to choose


Towards a brighter future - harambe!

President's editorial

The year of the disadvantaged and the vulnerable

The International Diabetes Federation is engaged in a global strategic plan to raise awareness of diabetes. One of the principal tools to help unite awareness-raising efforts worldwide is IDF’s World Diabetes Day campaign. Spread over 12 months, the campaign climaxes in the World Diabetes Day celebrations that take place on or around 14 November. World Diabetes Day offers a unique opportunity for the global diabetes community to celebrate the lives of people with diabetes and raise awareness of the condition among the general public and healthcare decision makers.

Migration and diabetes: the emerging challenge

Diabetes is affecting more and more people every year. In the last decade, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes of one kind or another increased by almost 50%. By the year 2025, more than 300 million people around the world could have been diagnosed with the condition. Many others who have diabetes will not have been diagnosed. Diabetes also represents a major threat to the health of the world’s millions of migrants, who appear to be at greater risk of developing diabetes than non-migrants. Manuel Carballo and Frederik Siem report.

Answering the urgent need for diabetes care personnel in northern India

Nobody can single-handedly manage the many and diverse aspects of diabetes. To be effective, diabetes care requires the coordinated input of people with diabetes and a range of healthcare providers, including a diabetes nurse, dietician, psychologist, pharmacist, physiotherapist or podiatrist, among others. Close