Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)

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Clinical trials confirm that type 2 diabetes is preventable

Until recently, randomized clinical trials offered only limited proof that Type 2 diabetes is preventable by changes in lifestyle. Fortunately, this gap has now been filled. Several major lifestyle intervention trials have been successfully completed. The results are consistent: the risk of Type 2 diabetes can be halved in people who are at high risk; the effect of lifestyle change is rapid; the lifestyle changes required to achieve a significant risk reduction do not have to be drastic; and benefits are similar in different ethnic groups.

Poverty versus genes: the social context of Type 2 diabetes

Together with its 'twin sister', childhood obesity, Type 2 diabetes is spreading among young people around the world. This constitutes a serious public health problem; by their 30s, generations of young people will have been living with Type 2

The diabetes epidemic in full flight: forecasting the future

Were there warnings that diabetes would become the epidemic of the 21st century? In the early 1970s, Peter Bennett and co-workers reported on the extraordinarily high prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in Pima Native Americans. In 1975, we reported the high rates of diabetes in the Micronesian Nauruans in the Pacific. Similar findings followed in other Pacific and Asian island populations. They all indicated the potential for a future global epidemic.

A new Diabetes Atlas: new data, new hope

"More than 300 million people world wide are at risk of developing diabetes, and the disease's economic impact in some hard-hit countries could be higher than that of the AIDS pandemic, diabetes experts warned." Reuters, 25 August 2003. This was the thrust of an article which was read by people all over the world on the day on which the second edition of the Diabetes Atlas was launched by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF).

Detect-2: early detection of type 2 diabetes and IGT

Type 2 diabetes has reached pandemic levels, with the global number of people with the condition predicted to exceed 330 million by 2025. Overall, at least 50% of those with diabetes presently do not know that they have the condition. In developing countries the proportion with undiagnosed diabetes is considerably higher. At the time of clinical diagnosis, every second person with diabetes has already developed one or more micro- or macrovascular complications.

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