Women

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The fattening rooms of Calabar - a breeding ground for diabesity

Calabar is the capital city of Cross River State of Nigeria. It is a cosmopolitan town with a population of about half a million people. The population of Cross River State stands at around 2.5 million. Inhabitants of the region are mostly farmers, fishermen and civil servants. The Efik in south Calabar are a proud people with a rich cultural heritage. In Efik communities, the preservation of centuries-old values and customs is central to the tradition of ‘fattening rooms’.

Abject poverty, major difficulties and tragic outcomes in Cambodia

When her doctor diagnosed her with type 2 diabetes in 1997, it was shocking news to Sokhann. For more than a decade, she lived with her condition without any treatment, education or follow-up.

Bambi in danger - poverty and unmet needs in Mauritania

Bambi is a 19-year old Mauritanian woman. Illiterate and poor, she is married and has a four-year-old daughter. Early in 2008, she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. It took her 10 months of struggle to learn to read her blood glucose monitoring device and inject insulin.

Xiaoping's story: multiple psychosocial barriers to a full and happy life

Xiaoping, a 15-year-old girl living in a rural region of china, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in october 2007. since then, her life has undergone a series of dramatic changes.

Treating people with type 1 diabetes and eating disorders - the need for a multidisciplinary approach

Since early case reports in the 1980’s, there has been considerable interest in examining the connection between type 1 diabetes and eating disorders. Some researchers argue that the attention to food portions (especially carbohydrates), blood glucose, body weight, and exercise that are characteristic of standard medical treatment for type 1 diabetes resembles the rigid thinking about food and body image that is characteristic of people with eating disorders without diabetes.

Addressing barriers to care in elderly African-American women in rural areas

Diabetes is a major health concern; 246 million people are diagnosed and living with the disease worldwide. The growing global prevalence of type 2 diabetes is correlated with the ongoing rise in obesity. In the USA, where diabetes is the fifth-leading cause of death, the number of people with the condition has tripled in the last 30 years. The number of people with the condition is set to increase in coming years as populations age.

Breastfeeding and diabetes - benefits and special needs

Breastfeeding has numerous advantages for mothers with diabetes and their babies. Nursing mothers have lower insulin requirements and better control of their blood glucose; breastfed babies may have a lower risk of developing diabetes themselves. Alison Stuebe describes these potential benefits and highlights the special needs of breastfeeding mothers with diabetes.

Learning the lessons - preventing type 2 diabetes in Nepal

Diabetes has become a significant public health problem in urban Nepal. Studies carried out by the Nepal Diabetes Association in towns and cities throughout the country have revealed a diabetes prevalence of around 15% among people aged 20 years and above, and 19% among people aged 40 years and above. The Association has identified a number of key issues which continue to exacerbate this epidemic in Nepal.

Polycystic ovary syndrome and women with diabetes

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder to affect women of reproductive age. Although it was first described almost 70 years ago, there has been no universal agreement about its definition. Eleni Kousta and Stephen Franks describe the prevalence, symptoms, and cause of PCOS, and look at long-term health implications and the available and possible future treatments for women with the syndrome.

Pregnancy

Diabetes increases the risks in pregnancy for both the mother and her infant. However, pre-pregnancy advice where possible, detection of undiagnosed or new (gestational) diabetes in pregnancy, and careful management of diabetes throughout pregnancy, with close liaison between healthcare professionals involved in diabetes, obstetric and neonatal care, can all help to achieve the desired outcome of a healthy mother and baby. The Global Guideline only addresses areas of pregnancy care that are commonly affected by the

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