Research and studies

English

Caregiver reports of provider recommended frequency of blood glucose monitoring and actual testing frequency for youth with type 1 diabetes

 

Joyce P. Yi-Frazier and colleagues for the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study Group
 

Anthropometric indicators of obesity for identifying cardiometabolic risks in a rural Bangladeshi population – Chandra Diabetes Study

Professor Akhtar Hussain’s aim of studying anthropometric indicators of obesity was to evaluate the predictive ability of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percentages for the presence of cardiometabolic risks—namely type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and the metabolic syndrome.

China’s 3C Study – the people behind the numbers

Type 1 diabetes is a complex and challenging disease due to its physiological, behavioural and psychosocial characteristics. Diabetes care and education is life-long and people who are affected must adapt as they age. In 2011, IDF launched the 3C Study – Coverage, Cost and Care of type 1 diabetes, in collaboration with the Chinese Diabetes Society, in order to understand better how this disease affects people living in the Beijing and Shantou areas.

Estimating the worldwide burden of type 1 diabetes

Providing an accurate estimate of the number of children with type 1 diabetes is an essential component of planning health policy, assessing the quality of care and driving research. There is good evidence that the incidence of type 1 diabetes among children is increasing in many parts of the world. The International Diabetes Federation’s Diabetes Atlas, 5th edition, estimates that increase to be 3% per year. The cause of this rise is unknown, although it may be linked to a number of factors.

Diabetes in prison: double the sentence or an opportunity for treatment?

Among the prison population, psychological disorders and infectious diseases, such as hepatitis and HIV/AIDS, are the most widely recognized medical conditions. According to the authors of this report from France, diabetes is one of the ‘forgotten diseases’ in the penal system. Although in wider society diabetes is recognized as a chronic public health issue, there are very few data on people with diabetes in prison.

IDF first to address the question: is bariatric surgery good for diabetes?

Last year, ID F’s Taskforce on Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes convened a working group to review the role of surgery in the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes. Bariatric surgery, in which the gastrointestinal tract is operated on with the intention of achieving weight loss, has been shown to have significant metabolic benefit. In December last year, 20 people representing all the ID F regions, and different clinical disciplines, met at ID F’s headquarters to review the available evidence and consider the potential of the procedures for people with diabetes.

Where the search for a cure will take us: what to look for in type 1 diabetes research in the coming decade

In 1970, parents of children with type 1 diabetes in America organized what has become the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). The JDRF’s mission, then as now, has been constant: to find a cure for type 1 diabetes and its complications through the vehicle of research. JDRF has grown to be the world’s largest charitable funder and advocate for type 1 diabetes research. Although based in the USA, JDRF has always supported the best research in type 1 diabetes, wherever it may be.

Improving accuracy, ensuring consistency – the future for reporting HbA1c

Globally, where the test is available, the measurement of haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has become central to the management of diabetes. By giving an objective assessment of glucose control over the preceding 2 to 3 months, it can guide treatment decisions in a way that single blood glucose measurements cannot. The authors describe efforts to standardize and improve the way HbA1c is reported, and explain the practical implications of the recent changes in the way the test is measured.

The implications of the new Chinese prevalence study

At the end of March 2010, a diabetes prevalence survey attracted the attention of the world’s general media. Diabetes prevalence surveys are not usually terribly exciting to audiences outside the world of epidemiology but the number of people in China estimated to have diabetes now was so large that it took the news world by surprise. The findings of the study have a number of important implications for China and beyond. International Diabetes Federation epidemiologist, David Whiting describes why this study is important and how it adds to our knowledge about the diabetes pandemic.

Access to insulin and barriers to care: results of the RAPIA in Vietnam

Access to diabetes care in many countries is problematic due to a variety of factors. These can range from the cost of medication to the distance that people with diabetes need to travel to access a trained healthcare provider. Without adequate access to medication and care, people with diabetes face complications and early death. The authors report on an evaluation of the provision of care and supplies for people with diabetes in Vietnam.

 


Pages