Research and studies

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The implications of the new Chinese prevalence study

At the end of March 2010, a diabetes prevalence survey attracted the attention of the world’s general media. Diabetes prevalence surveys are not usually terribly exciting to audiences outside the world of epidemiology but the number of people in China estimated to have diabetes now was so large that it took the news world by surprise. The findings of the study have a number of important implications for China and beyond. International Diabetes Federation epidemiologist, David Whiting describes why this study is important and how it adds to our knowledge about the diabetes pandemic.

Access to insulin and barriers to care: results of the RAPIA in Vietnam

Access to diabetes care in many countries is problematic due to a variety of factors. These can range from the cost of medication to the distance that people with diabetes need to travel to access a trained healthcare provider. Without adequate access to medication and care, people with diabetes face complications and early death. The authors report on an evaluation of the provision of care and supplies for people with diabetes in Vietnam.

 


DIAMAP - mapping the future of diabetes research

It may be a surprise to hear that at present there is no overall plan or framework to coordinate or fund research into diabetes across Europe – despite the urgent attention called to the disease from many organizations both patient-led and professional. Although investigators within different research fields and individual research groups have a good idea of where their research is heading, and although national diabetes associations may have drawn up research strategies in order to use national funds wisely, there is no Europe-wide strategy.


New findings in gestational diabetes - the HAPO Study

The diagnosis of gestational diabetes has for decades been based either on criteria that predict a mother’s risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the future, or those used for non-pregnant women. But gestational diabetes also carries a risk for the baby. Moreover, the level at which maternal blood glucose provokes risk for the foetus remains unclear.


The results and implications of the ACCORD and ADVANCE trials

Recently, two clinical trials addressed the role of tight blood glucose control on cardiovascular risk in people with type 2 diabetes: the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study and the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease (ADVANCE) trial. The ACCORD study included 10,251 people with type 2 diabetes and was designed to determine whether intensive blood glucose control (HbA1c below 6%) as compared to a conventional approach (HbA1c between 7% and 7.9%) would result in favourable cardiovascular outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes at high vascular risk.

How is diabetes perceived? The results of the DAWN Youth survey

In 2001, the Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) study interviewed more than 5400 adults with diabetes and more than 3800 diabetes care professionals in 13 countries. The main purpose of  that research was to identify new ways to overcome the psychosocial barriers to the optimal health and quality of life of people with diabetes and those at risk.

The DAWN verdict on diabetes support in schools: could do better

Because their condition affects every aspect of their daily  life, children and adolescents with diabetes are faced with more problems than are many of their peers without diabetes. The greater part of their day is spent at school, and this is where many of the greatest problems lie. Dealing with diabetes in school is one of the most important topics in the daily life of many families. The 2007 online WebTalk survey, conducted in eight countries as part of the DAWN Youth survey, has contributed to an increased understanding of the issues faced by children and adolescents with diabetes.

Do stem cells hold the key to a future cure for diabetes?

The high expectations that stem cells will cure diabetes have been met with a considerable degree of scepticism, particularly from people who have been hearing for decades that a cure is ‘just around the corner’. The conclusion of this article is that stem cell biology is promising and might deliver the advances the diabetes community has been waiting for. But no one knows how long this will take; no timetables for expected success will be presented – which might be a disappointment to some.

IDF hosting innovative diabetes projects in 11 communities around the world

The BRIDGES grant programme is dedicated to supporting translational research in diabetes worldwide. The structure of BRIDGES is in place and the programme has taken the first steps towards accomplishing its overarching objective: to bridge the gap between science and people with diabetes – between clinical research and clinical practice – by supporting cost-effective and sustainable interventions to prevent and control diabetes.


Closing the information gap: the HINARI, AGORA and OARE programmes

The lack of access to scientific and medical literature has historically been a major challenge in developing countries. In a world that is increasingly digital, effective opportunities now exist for connecting healthcare providers, researchers and policy-makers with online research and clinical information. The authors report on HINARI, AGORA and OARE programmes built on partnerships between publishers and UN organizations which provide researchers from developing countries with access to the world’s latest scientific literature.

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