Research and studies

English

The Public Library of Science: opening access to medical research

There are thousands of medical journals worldwide, many of them publishing articles that report diabetes-relevant research. The growth of Internet publishing has made this knowledge universally available – in theory. However, the contents of peer-reviewed medical journals are beyond the reach of most of the world’s healthcare providers and indeed most people with diabetes. Publishers limit access to the latest research findings to those institutions and individuals that can afford to pay for it.

The BRIDGES programme: sharing practical solutions and improving outcome

Diabetes is now the world’s fourth leading cause of death by illness, and the global epidemic shows no signs of abating. In recent decades, a revolution in science has contributed to a greater understanding of diabetes and the development of new cutting-edge therapies. However, diabetes prevalence, and diabetes-related death and disability have continued to grow rapidly.

The changing face of coeliac disease: links with other autoimmune disorders

The onset of coeliac disease, together with type 1 diabetes, influences glycaemic control, and more precisely the development of hypoglycaemia. These conditions share a similar genotype. The main problem of coeliac disease is intolerance to gliadin, a gluten protein found in cereals such as wheat, rye and barley; the only treatment is a gluten-free diet. Spomenka Ljubic and Zeljko Metelko report on the growing body of evidence linking coeliac disease and other autoimmune disorders, including type 1 diabetes, and describe recommended procedures for its diagnosis and treatment.

Breastfeeding and diabetes - benefits and special needs

Breastfeeding has numerous advantages for mothers with diabetes and their babies. Nursing mothers have lower insulin requirements and better control of their blood glucose; breastfed babies may have a lower risk of developing diabetes themselves. Alison Stuebe describes these potential benefits and highlights the special needs of breastfeeding mothers with diabetes.

Diabetes in children: changing trends in an emerging epidemic

The number of children with diabetes is growing. Some countries, particularly in the developed world, are seeing a significant increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes; type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents is an emerging problem worldwide. Premature deaths as a result of undiagnosed diabetes are a large and hidden global problem. Moreover, children with diabetes risk developing disabling and life-threatening complications at an early age, placing a significant human and economic burden on families and societies.

New data, fresh perspectives: Diabetes Atlas, Third Edition

The third edition of the Diabetes Atlas was launched in December 2006, at the 19th World Diabetes Congress of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in Cape Town, South Africa. The aim of the Atlas, which has been described as the flagship publication of IDF, is to provide the most recent and accurate information on diabetes in 2007 and provide estimates of the likely impact of the condition up to 2025. Its purpose is to disseminate the most up-to-date and salient facts concerning the scope, impact and burden of diabetes globally and on a regional and country-by-country basis.

Cape Town 2006: a global event with a focus on Africa and the developing world

When IDF brings together the global diabetes community at a World Diabetes Congress, it does so with a number of key objectives, which include raising overall diabetes awareness, sharing innovative ideas and best practices, and helping to build and consolidate networks – in line with the Federation’s mission to promote care, prevention and a cure for diabetes worldwide.

A month to remember

Editorial

The IDF Education Foundation: promoting excellence in diabetes care

The IDF Education Foundation was established in 1992 during the IDF Presidency of Wendell Mayes Jr. The Foundation is a practical benevolent initiative which, since its inception, has functioned exclusively in support of people with diabetes in developing regions. These countries constitute the bulk of the IDF membership; 60% of Member Associations are in countries with an annual GDP of less than 3500 USD per capita.

Polycystic ovary syndrome and women with diabetes

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder to affect women of reproductive age. Although it was first described almost 70 years ago, there has been no universal agreement about its definition. Eleni Kousta and Stephen Franks describe the prevalence, symptoms, and cause of PCOS, and look at long-term health implications and the available and possible future treatments for women with the syndrome.

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