Research and studies

English

Psycho-social care for people with diabetes: what the guidelines say

Results from a number of recent studies highlight the importance of psycho-social factors in diabetes management. Research shows that psychological co-morbidity is prevalent in people with diabetes. As a result, well-being, self-care and glycaemic control are adversely affected. Depression is common in people with diabetes, and

Understanding the psychological barriers to effective diabetes therapy

In order to minimize the risk of diabetes complications, effective therapy for people with Type 2 diabetes involves lifestyle changes and poly-pharmacy targeting levels of blood glucose, blood pressure and blood fat. However, the strict targets set in recent guidelines are seldom achieved by the majority of people with diabetes. Barriers to effective diabetes therapy have been identified within the organization of health care and in the interaction between health-care providers and people with

Diabetes attitudes, wishes and needs

The overall objective of Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) is to improve the psycho-social support for people with diabetes. This global Programme is led by Novo Nordisk, in partnership with the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), and an advisory panel of leading diabetes experts. The DAWN activities began with the DAWN Study in 2001. This global investigation into the affective aspects of the condition facilitated comparisons and cross-referencing between the key players in the diabetes community. The key finding was that critical gaps

Eighty nobel prize winners appeal to President Bush

US President George W Bush received a letter that came straight to the point. “We urge you to support stem cell research.” This appeal did not waste words. The signatories had already said and done enough that is meaningful: no less than eighty of the signatures were Nobel prize winners. Stem cell research promises help to numerous people affected by chronic diseases and illnesses. The supporting argument is that if the embryos are to be destroyed anyway, would it not be better if they could be used to save the chronically ill.

Rise in diabetes prevalence poses significant socio-economic threat in Australia

The killer twins – diabetes and obesity – are set to shatter the national health budget, according to two of Australia’s leading diabetes experts. They said diabetes and its associated complications, including heart and kidney disease, were poised to become Australia’s most significant and costly public health problem within a decade, swamping future health budgets and resources.

Latest studies clarify state of health in Bahrain

For the past few decades, the Government of Bahrain has been consistently and conscientiously updating the country’s healthcare system, endeavouring to keep up with the demands placed upon it. Luckily so, because, in 1994 it was found that the figures they had been dealing with were way off track. In 1989, a Committee for Primary Care was formed by the Government of Bahrain’s Ministry of Health, standardizing care through establishing rules and regulations to guide physicians treating people with diabetes.

The other global fuel crisis

President's editorial

Epidemiological studies lay the ground for Syrian diabetes campaign

As in many countries of the world, Syria, with its 16 million inhabitants, has witnessed a tremendous change in food habits and lifestyle within the last few decades. This has been reflected in the rise of metabolic diseases in general and diabetes in particular. Three studies have shown that the prevalence of diabetes in Syria is probably higher than published reports have claimed. One of the aims of the Syrian National Diabetes Programme, adopted in 1995, was to assess the national situation by carrying out epidemiological studies.

Diabetes to priority for Iranian National Advisory Committee

The first systematic epidemiological studies in Iran were begun in 1993. However, in light of the growing number of people with diabetes and the accruing costs, estimated to exceed US$400 million a year, a need was recognized in 1998 to study the more recent epidemiology of diabetes in Iran. In 1998 the National Committee for Diabetes was formed, and a project undertaken in 1999 involving nearly 2.5 million people. Many other substantial moves have been made in Iran to help deal with diabetes in the country.

Atlas puts diabetes on the world map

“The spread of the western diet and couch-potato lifestyle has transformed diabetes, a ‘disease of affluence’ that now affects five percent of adults, into one of the world’s worst and fastest-growing health epidemics.” Financial Times, 6 November 2000. This was the thrust of the message read by thousands of people all over the world on the day the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) launched its first diabetes atlas, Diabetes Atlas 2000.

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