Psychological issues

English

Diabetes Distress:a real and normal part of diabetes

Living successfully with type 1 or type 2 diabetes requires the very large task of managing a serious chronic condition.  The tasks associated with diabetes can be complex and demanding and most people in their life journey with diabetes report great frustration with the burden of the disease.

DAWN2 study results on families: the hidden burden of diabetes

Discrimination and diabetes

The DAWN2TMstudy has categorized a massive amount of information on different aspects of the needs of people with diabetes, and the findings on discrimination are amongst the most interesting. The history of the condition provides many examples of its unacceptable consequences.


Protecting kids’ rights: IDF and select partners launch Kids and Diabetes in Schools (KIDS) project in Brazil and India

 

Anne Belton and Bénédicte Pansier

Psychological challenges for children living with diabetes

Diana Naranjo and Korey Hood

Breaking down barriers and living your dreams ... with diabetes

João Valente Nabais, President of the IDF European Region and development lead for the Living with Diabetes Stream, is passionate about the 2013 Melbourne programme. Living with type 1 diabetes since 1981, João has been an active diabetes advocate ever since his youth. This year, LWD delivers a unique opportunity for people to become inspired and work on realising dreams.

Barriers to self-management in people affected by chronic disease

Diabetes healthcare providers are no strangers to the self-management model. Indeed, it could be said that diabetes is the field in which the self-management model has been most thoroughly developed and implemented. The marriage of expert clinical care with self-management by the individual is an ideal union and an increasingly common objective. It is an excellent goal – one that is achievable by many. Yet a number of systematic barriers to self-management exists.

Lessons from the learners - turning hope into action

From time to time, family doctor and chief medical officer Alan Glaseroff interviews panels of people with diabetes in front of an audience of other people with diabetes, medical professionals, diabetes educators and clinical teams. The panel members are people who, having successfully overcome obstacles which at first caused them to struggle with their condition, are willing to share their stories.

Art beyond therapy: when patients and healthcare providers share the limelight

Healthcare implies sound knowledge in the field of biomedicine, underpinned by evidence-based medicine. There is another fundamental dimension: the healthcare provider-patient relationship. Balint studied the gap between the professional identity of doctors and the reality of patients – an ocean of unspoken messages separates their worlds. The further dimension is that of therapeutic education, the objective of which is to help people to become more autonomous. In these three aspects of healthcare, the relationship between patients and doctors is never even.

Art as a development process for people with a chronic condition

There are various ways to improve people’s capacity to cope with the psychological burden of a chronic condition. A recent programme based on self-expression through painting demonstrated a way of discovering a person’s potential for development and self-efficacy. This report describes the structure and process of a painting workshop programme for people affected by a chronic condition. Attending one or several painting workshops, the participants used the art material to express and give shape to their inner suffering associated with their condition.

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