Psychological issues


Diabetes and depression in older women - double the risk, double the burden

In the USA, approximately 24 million people have diabetes; more than half are women, and projections to 2050 suggest that women of all ages will continue to represent more than half of all cases. A growing concern  for  women with diabetes is the increased risk to many of developing major depression. The results from a recent meta-analysis of 42 studies showed that women with diabetes have a higher prevalence of depression (28%) than men with diabetes (18%).

Xiaoping's story: multiple psychosocial barriers to a full and happy life

Xiaoping, a 15-year-old girl living in a rural region of china, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in october 2007. since then, her life has undergone a series of dramatic changes.

The importance of a proactive response to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes

People  with  diabetes  face  a  range  of challenges. Having the condition affects all areas of life; a number of psychological and emotional factors are involved. Recently, one of the authors of this article, Robin Wynyard, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The shock of being diagnosed provoked in him and his partner, Sue Shea, negative feelings that included fear, anxiety and uncertainty – a common emotional response which often goes unreported in the related literature.

Obesity stigma - causes, effects and some practical solutions

Obesity has become a pandemic, affecting adults and children around the world.  Considerable medical, scientific and lifestyle-related knowledge and resources are being channelled into the identification of strategies to combat this major public health problem. Despite these multidisciplinary efforts, however, little attention has been paid to the damaging social and psychological consequences of obesity.

The key to preventing burnout: understanding the burden of diabetes treatment

Type 2 diabetes significantly increases a person’s risk of developing multiple health complications, but the risk of these complications can be significantly reduced with modern, comprehensive diabetes care. This care is inherently complex because of its use of multiple medications in conjunction with lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, and blood glucose self-monitoring.

Meeting very special needs

President's editorial

Bringing youth diabetes to light

Guest Editor's editorial

The DAWN Youth initiative - setting priorities for action

DAWN Youth is a worldwide initiative dedicated to improving the level and conditions of psychosocial support for children, adolescents and young adults with diabetes and their families worldwide. For young people affected by the condition, having to learn to accept diabetes as a part of daily living is a far greater trauma than is realized by many – even health professionals. For their families, it is a complex burden: daily diabetes management is largely in the hands of the family and the young person.

How is diabetes perceived? The results of the DAWN Youth survey

In 2001, the Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN) study interviewed more than 5400 adults with diabetes and more than 3800 diabetes care professionals in 13 countries. The main purpose of  that research was to identify new ways to overcome the psychosocial barriers to the optimal health and quality of life of people with diabetes and those at risk.

The DAWN verdict on diabetes support in schools: could do better

Because their condition affects every aspect of their daily  life, children and adolescents with diabetes are faced with more problems than are many of their peers without diabetes. The greater part of their day is spent at school, and this is where many of the greatest problems lie. Dealing with diabetes in school is one of the most important topics in the daily life of many families. The 2007 online WebTalk survey, conducted in eight countries as part of the DAWN Youth survey, has contributed to an increased understanding of the issues faced by children and adolescents with diabetes.