Psychological issues

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Editor's surprise

Editior-in-chief 's editorial

The effects of diabetes on depression and depression on diabetes

Diabetes can have both a daily and long-term impact on people with the condition – both physically and in terms of its psychosocial effects. It is now known that people with diabetes are at a substantially increased risk of experiencing mental distress, particularly depression. Furthermore, a growing bank of evidence points to a two-way relationship between the conditions. Yet depression is often under-diagnosed in people with diabetes.

Treating people with type 1 diabetes and eating disorders - the need for a multidisciplinary approach

Since early case reports in the 1980’s, there has been considerable interest in examining the connection between type 1 diabetes and eating disorders. Some researchers argue that the attention to food portions (especially carbohydrates), blood glucose, body weight, and exercise that are characteristic of standard medical treatment for type 1 diabetes resembles the rigid thinking about food and body image that is characteristic of people with eating disorders without diabetes.

Alzheimer's, dementia and diabetes - where are the connections?

Diabetes is considered to be a kind of accelerated aging – by increasing a person’s susceptibility to degenerative conditions, including kidney disease, retinopathy, hypertension, coronary artery disease, stroke, and atherosclerosis. Recently, evidence has accumulated to suggest that diabetes also plays a role in accelerated brain aging. But while it is known that diabetes may be associated with an increased risk of dementia, the exact mechanisms and mitigating factors remain unclear.


Addressing barriers to care in elderly African-American women in rural areas

Diabetes is a major health concern; 246 million people are diagnosed and living with the disease worldwide. The growing global prevalence of type 2 diabetes is correlated with the ongoing rise in obesity. In the USA, where diabetes is the fifth-leading cause of death, the number of people with the condition has tripled in the last 30 years. The number of people with the condition is set to increase in coming years as populations age.

Taking up the struggle to improve care: a journey with diabetes

During a meeting halfway through a 24-month project for the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), surrounded by well-known health professionals, Barbara Elster was asked her opinion on one of the subjects under discussion. Having expressed her views, she contemplated how she, a person with no formal medical training, had come to be in such esteemed medical company, involved in producing national guidelines on diabetes for the UK Government.

From adolescence to adulthood: the transition from child to adult care

Adolescence, the period of transition from childhood to adulthood, is a key phase of human development. It is characterized by rapid changes – physical, sexual, psychological, emotional, cognitive, and social. The psychological imbalance that prevails during adolescence is particularly significant in people with diabetes as it often leads to a decline in self-care. This brings about a deterioration in blood glucose control, and creates difficulties that hamper the development of harmonious relationships between the young person with diabetes and his or her healthcare providers.

Family-centred education for migrants with diabetes in Scotland

A culturally sensitive, intensive diabetes education service is being delivered in the community to people of ethnic-minority origin living with type 2 diabetes in Lothian, Scotland. Designed by a pharmacist, the initiative began as a research project, but the effectiveness and popularity of the programme resulted in its development and implementation as part of the local diabetes care package.

Translating science into practice: the US National Diabetes Education Program

The USA ranks third in the global prevalence of diabetes, preceded only by India and China. About 7% of the population has diabetes. A third of the total number of people with the condition is believed to be undiagnosed and therefore not receiving treatment to reduce the risk of disabling and life-threatening diabetes complications. The economic costs of diabetes are enormous – estimated at 132 billion USD in 2002. The mission of the US National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is to reduce diabetes-related illness and death.

Convivencias: a low-cost model for holistic diabetes education

The objective of holiday camps for children and adolescents with diabetes is to create an environment in which they can learn to embrace their condition and its treatment. Achieving and maintaining good blood glucose control is a key aim; the camps provide excellent opportunities for young people to learn and practise diabetes skills and become familiar with the latest techniques.

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