Psychological issues

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Educating, supporting, understanding: a challenging role for parents of children with diabetes

Diabetes is a family affair. When a child is diagnosed with diabetes, a wide range of challenges affects parents and siblings. While the role of parents in day-to-day living with diabetes is subject to constant change according to the age of their child, it is always crucial. Families constantly experience their loved-one’s diabetes, in an emotional as well as a practical sense. Eveline van Gulik explores some of the challenges faced by parents of children with diabetes, and describes, from her own experience, the enormous impact on family life.

Helping people in times of crisis - mobilizing the power of humanity

Average temperatures are rising due primarily to the release of increased amounts of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases through the burning of fossil fuels. This is provoking other changes, including rising sea levels and changes in rainfall. These changes appear to be increasing the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events – floods, droughts, heat waves, hurricanes, and tornados – which have the potential to provoke large-scale human crises.

Energy, motivation and commitment - the IDF Youth Ambassadors

In many countries, young people work effectively as advocates for a range of causes, from inner-city regeneration to anti-bullying and smoking cessation. An IDF initiative aimed to engage Youth Ambassadors in diabetes advocacy worldwide and specifically to participate at as many levels as possible in IDF’s global awareness campaign ’Unite For Diabetes’. In this article, representatives from the group describe the principles and objectives of the IDF Youth Ambassadors programme and make a call for increased involvement of young people in diabetes advocacy.

Variations in risk perception: South Asians living in the UK and their healthcare professionals

Diabetes has become a global health problem, reaching epidemic proportions worldwide with serious implications for health and well-being. The International Diabetes Federation estimates that by 2025, almost 350 million people will have diabetes. People who are most vulnerable to this chronic disease include those living in developing countries, and members of minority ethnic groups and socio-economically disadvantaged people in developed countries.

Patient education and psychological care

People with diabetes deliver most of their own care. This reflects the observation that diabetes and its associated features touch on most aspects of daily living, and aspects as fundamental as eating and physical activity. To deliver such care requires knowledge, but even with knowledge it may not be easy to adjust to optimal self-care. This makes patient education a complex therapeutic issue.

High costs, low awareness and a lack of care - the diabetic foot in Nigeria

Nigeria, with a population of about 128 million people, is Africa’s most populous country. Life expectancy at birth is 47 years; about 60% of the population live below the poverty line. While healthcare structures and institutions are inadequate, and there is a chronic lack of skilled healthcare personnel, diabetes is on the increase. Uncontrolled urbanization is the driving force behind rising obesity levels and a subsequent boom in levels of type 2 diabetes.

Prevention of diabetes and its complications: key goals in Finland

The 10-year National Diabetes Programme in Finland (DEHKO) has been up and running for 6 years. The formal evaluations carried out to date indicate that the Programme continues to have a positive impact in a number of areas of diabetes care in Finland. Moreover, prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications remain the principle objectives of DEHKO. Timo Saaristo and Leena Etu-Seppälä report on FIN-D2D (2003-2007), the DEHKO project to implement primary prevention of type 2 diabetes in five regions – potentially affecting 1.5 million people.

Barriers to healthcare among homeless people with diabetes

It is estimated that about half of all homeless people suffer from chronic medical conditions. Unfortunately, these people frequently encounter many more barriers to care than the general population – exacerbating their health problems. The plight of homeless people with diabetes is particularly severe, since managing the condition requires adherence to a demanding care plan.

From practice and research to large-scale implementation: the 3rd DAWN summit

The Diabetes Attitudes Wishes and Needs (DAWN) programme was launched in 2001 with the global DAWN study. Initiated by Novo Nordisk in partnership with the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and an international expert advisory board, the DAWN programme aims to respond to shortcomings in diabetes care; less than half of the people who are diagnosed with diabetes worldwide reach optimal health and quality of life. The 3rd DAWN summit, which was held recently in Florence, Italy, gathered 900 experts, people with diabetes, policy-makers

Migration and diabetes: the emerging challenge

Diabetes is affecting more and more people every year. In the last decade, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes of one kind or another increased by almost 50%. By the year 2025, more than 300 million people around the world could have been diagnosed with the condition. Many others who have diabetes will not have been diagnosed. Diabetes also represents a major threat to the health of the world’s millions of migrants, who appear to be at greater risk of developing diabetes than non-migrants. Manuel Carballo and Frederik Siem report.

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