Prevention and screening

English

Why screen for type 2 diabetes?

It is well known that the number of people with diabetes is increasing rapidly across the globe such that in 2015, IDF estimated there were 415 million adults living with diabetes, the vast majority of whom have type 2 diabetes. What is not so well known is that almost half of all people living with diabetes do not know they have it.


Early detection and timely treatment can prevent or delay diabetic retinopathy

The increased prevalence of diabetes means that more and more people are also developing diabetes complications, such as diabetic retinopathy.

Cost-effective and cost-saving interventions for prevention and control of diabetes

Diabetes imposes large economic burdens on national healthcare systems across the world. In 2015, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated that 415 million adults aged 20 to 79 years had diabetes and USD 673 billion was spent to treat diabetes and its related complications. This accounted for 11.6% of the total health expenditure worldwide.

Tackling childhood obesity: a novel school-based programme in India

Childhood obesity, which predisposes to type 2 diabetes and several other diseases, is an emerging health problem in India.

WDC 2015: Assessing global progress and results

The Global Health Challenges Stream at the upcoming IDF World Diabetes Congress in Vancouver addresses many issues of global importance, linking diabetes risk and outcomes with demographics, politics, nutrition, reproduction, co-morbidities, technology and trade. Many of the topics will touch on the solutions for translating scientifically proven concepts into population benefits.

Schools open doors to lifestyle lessons in Tunisia


An epidemiological transition is occurring in Tunisia. Prevalence of diabetes has increased from 2.3% in 1977 to 6.4% in 1990 and reached 10 to 15% in 2000. Increased diabetes prevalence is rising hand-in-hand with obesity, which represents an important risk factor of type 2 diabetes.

In the spirit of patient centeredness


Angus Forbes

Are the latest treatment innovations enough for people living with diabetes in the 21st century? How can the medical profession utilise current technologies and treatment innovations without losing touch with patient values and the power of compassion and insight?

Why health matters to human development

Helen Clark, Administrator of the UN Development Programme, reflects on the development agenda post-2015 and explains how better prevention and care of Non-communicable Diseases fit into her vision for a broader development goal thereby decreasing the threat NCDs pose to progress.

Healthy Cities report

In our first Healthy Cities report, Diabetes Voice highlights municipal and national governing policies that are trailblazing new directions for human health.  

Good things come in pairs: the Cambodia-Korea Twinning Project

Professor Bong Yun Cha, Chairman of the Korean Diabetes Association and Dr. Touch Khun, Chief of Diabetology at the Preah Kossamak Hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia report on the exciting partnership reflected in the IDF’s Association Twinning Initiative. Learn how people living with diabetes in Cambodia are getting extra help for better care by virtue of the first and more significantly, the second, Cambodia-Korea Twinning Project.


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