Prevention and screening

English

Schools open doors to lifestyle lessons in Tunisia


An epidemiological transition is occurring in Tunisia. Prevalence of diabetes has increased from 2.3% in 1977 to 6.4% in 1990 and reached 10 to 15% in 2000. Increased diabetes prevalence is rising hand-in-hand with obesity, which represents an important risk factor of type 2 diabetes.

In the spirit of patient centeredness


Angus Forbes

Are the latest treatment innovations enough for people living with diabetes in the 21st century? How can the medical profession utilise current technologies and treatment innovations without losing touch with patient values and the power of compassion and insight?

Why health matters to human development

Helen Clark, Administrator of the UN Development Programme, reflects on the development agenda post-2015 and explains how better prevention and care of Non-communicable Diseases fit into her vision for a broader development goal thereby decreasing the threat NCDs pose to progress.

Healthy Cities report

In our first Healthy Cities report, Diabetes Voice highlights municipal and national governing policies that are trailblazing new directions for human health.  

Good things come in pairs: the Cambodia-Korea Twinning Project

Professor Bong Yun Cha, Chairman of the Korean Diabetes Association and Dr. Touch Khun, Chief of Diabetology at the Preah Kossamak Hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia report on the exciting partnership reflected in the IDF’s Association Twinning Initiative. Learn how people living with diabetes in Cambodia are getting extra help for better care by virtue of the first and more significantly, the second, Cambodia-Korea Twinning Project.


Gestational diabetes – an update from India

In recent decades, more women of a reproductive age have diabetes, and more pregnancies are complicated by pre-existing diabetes especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Also of concern is gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) - the type of diabetes that is first recognized during pregnancy and affects up to 15% of women worldwide.


Guidelines for type 2 diabetes - designed to help newly diagnosed children and adolescents

The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically worldwide with potentially dire consequences to the health of children and to their future. Drs. Warren Lee of Singapore and Stuart Brink of the USA introduce the new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, explaining how the evidence-based recommendations are essential for all physicians involved in the care of children.


W.A.S.H. away the world’s dietary salt

The world’s current dietary salt consumption, more than twice the daily amount recommended, is rubbing the wound of declining public health. Increasing evidence suggests that a high salt intake may directly increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, obesity through soft drink consumption, and many other preventable diseases, including cancers. Restricting dietary salt is even more critical for high-risk populations, such as diabetes.

Anthropometric indicators of obesity for identifying cardiometabolic risks in a rural Bangladeshi population – Chandra Diabetes Study

Professor Akhtar Hussain’s aim of studying anthropometric indicators of obesity was to evaluate the predictive ability of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percentages for the presence of cardiometabolic risks—namely type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and the metabolic syndrome.

Preventing diabetes-related amputations in a developing country – steps in the right direction

In Pakistan, between 4% and 10% of people with diabetes develop a foot ulcer, and more than 10% of those ulcers lead to an amputation. The ‘diabetic foot’ is saddling Pakistan’s already resource-constrained economy with a tremendous and growing cost burden. Significant achievements have been made in preventing diabetes-related foot ulcers and improving foot care throughout the country, including the implementation of a highly effective ‘Step by Step’ programme. Under the auspices of that programme, training is provided for physicians, diabetes educators and foot care assistants.

Pages