Prevention and screening

English

Guidelines for type 2 diabetes - designed to help newly diagnosed children and adolescents

The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically worldwide with potentially dire consequences to the health of children and to their future. Drs. Warren Lee of Singapore and Stuart Brink of the USA introduce the new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, explaining how the evidence-based recommendations are essential for all physicians involved in the care of children.


W.A.S.H. away the world’s dietary salt

The world’s current dietary salt consumption, more than twice the daily amount recommended, is rubbing the wound of declining public health. Increasing evidence suggests that a high salt intake may directly increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, obesity through soft drink consumption, and many other preventable diseases, including cancers. Restricting dietary salt is even more critical for high-risk populations, such as diabetes.

Anthropometric indicators of obesity for identifying cardiometabolic risks in a rural Bangladeshi population – Chandra Diabetes Study

Professor Akhtar Hussain’s aim of studying anthropometric indicators of obesity was to evaluate the predictive ability of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percentages for the presence of cardiometabolic risks—namely type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and the metabolic syndrome.

Preventing diabetes-related amputations in a developing country – steps in the right direction

In Pakistan, between 4% and 10% of people with diabetes develop a foot ulcer, and more than 10% of those ulcers lead to an amputation. The ‘diabetic foot’ is saddling Pakistan’s already resource-constrained economy with a tremendous and growing cost burden. Significant achievements have been made in preventing diabetes-related foot ulcers and improving foot care throughout the country, including the implementation of a highly effective ‘Step by Step’ programme. Under the auspices of that programme, training is provided for physicians, diabetes educators and foot care assistants.

Diabetes care at the centre of Australia: grassroots care and prevention

A report on the 2010 symposium on Indigenous peoples’ health held in Alice Springs, Australia

Preventing diabetes in the avenues and alleyways – homes and cities as exercise machines

The global obesity epidemic is already staggering – and it keeps on growing. In Canada, for example, one person in five is overweight and nearly one in 10 is obese – a two-and-a-half-fold increase over the past two decades. Moreover, obesity rates among children in Canada have almost tripled in the past 30 years. Our societies are transforming previously healthy children into generations of adults who in future decades will suffer widespread chronic ill-health and overpopulate hospital wards. Efforts to curb the trend have been largely unsuccessful.

Preventing diabetes in vulnerable communities - an American Indian story

American Indians lived healthy, balanced lifestyles for thousands of years before they were displaced to reservations. Reservation lands were typically not suitable for sustaining their traditional healthy lifestyles, which involved hunting, gathering, fishing and farming. Many diseases including diabetes were unknown until the 1950s. Nowadays, however, diabetes and its complications are major contributors to death and disability in every Tribal community.

Diabetic foot care and prevention in Senegal: adding an extra dimension to the Step-by-Step model

Every 30 seconds, a lower limb is amputated as a result of diabetes; of all the amputations in the world, about 70% are suffered by people with diabetes – foot ulceration being a key factor in developing regions. Yet these amputations can be prevented. As well as medical factors, numerous social and socio-environmental issues affect the development of diabetic foot problems. This report focuses on Africa-specific factors. Although in Africa neuropathy is a major contributing factor, it is not the only one: even a simple injury that becomes infected can be a precursor to amputation.

Improving accuracy, ensuring consistency – the future for reporting HbA1c

Globally, where the test is available, the measurement of haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has become central to the management of diabetes. By giving an objective assessment of glucose control over the preceding 2 to 3 months, it can guide treatment decisions in a way that single blood glucose measurements cannot. The authors describe efforts to standardize and improve the way HbA1c is reported, and explain the practical implications of the recent changes in the way the test is measured.

The Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative - tackling type 2 diabetes in Canada

In 2005, the Government of Canada provided a renewed investment of 190 million CAD over five years to maintain and enhance the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative. The main goal of the Initiative is to reduce type 2 diabetes and its complications through a range of culturally relevant health promotion and prevention services, delivered by trained health service providers and diabetes workers. Supported by Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative funding, Aboriginal communities across Canada are working to prevent and  manage type 2 diabetes. Amy Bell reports.

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