Prevention and screening

English

Can we prevent diabetes?

President's editorial

Pre-pregnancy care

In women with diabetes who come late in their pregnancy for antenatal care, it is difficult to calculate how many weeks pregnant they are, and hence difficult to optimize the time of delivery. Serious complications of diabetes can deteriorate and there is a high incidence of major birth defects in the babies. These abnormalities arise in the first ten weeks of pregnancy, which may be before a woman even knows she is pregnant or before she would come for antenatal care.

The challenge to movers and shakers: broad strategies to prevent obesity and diabetes

We know that in both Western and Asian adults in the vulnerable overweight groups with impaired glucose tolerance, modest weight loss with specific changes in diet and physical activity can reduce the likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes. Marked weight loss in severely obese people with diabetes can also ameliorate the risks from their diabetes perhaps for a decade or more. However, clinical interventions to achieve this require intensive personal supervision, which,

A threat to ethnic communities: diabetes and heart disease

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the USA has labelled diabetes 'the epidemic of our time'. Indeed, diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death by disease in the USA, with 75% of diabetes-related deaths attributable to cardiovascular disease. According to the US Office of Minority Health, the prevalence of diabetes among African-Americans is about 70% higher than in Caucasians, and the prevalence in Hispanics is nearly double that of Caucasians. Currently it is estimated that 2.3 million African-Americans and 1.2 million Hispanics have Type 2 diabetes in the USA alone.

Diabetes: its indirect costs. The costs of lost production

When someone is sick, be it short-term or long-term, we immediately think of the costs this person has to bear in terms of both physical pain and of the money needed to buy drugs and other supplies to get better or keep the condition under control. We might also go as far as to consider the financial costs borne by national healthcare systems. But there is more to health economics that this. Delve into this article to find out why we cannot remain blind to the so-called indirect costs of diabetes.

Diabetes research caught in the European spotlight

It all started in 1996, when the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) published a document entitled 'European Dimension of Diabetes Research'. Since then, enormous progress has been made towards a greater recognition of the relevance of diabetes research at European Union level.

DEHKO: Finland moves on primary prevention

In January 2000, the Development Programme for the Prevention and Care of Diabetes 2000-2010 (DEHKO) was officially approved as Finland's national diabetes programme. The first audit of the programme in 2003 has reported that the implementation process is well underway in both primary and specialized healthcare. The atmosphere among healthcare providers is positive and enthusiastic, and the word DEHKO is now firmly established in the lexicon of diabetes care in Finland.

Japanese school programmes combat type 2 diabetes

So-called 'late onset diabetes' is now more widely termed Type 2 diabetes. And for very good reasons. It was previously the case that childhood and adolescent diabetes was nearly exclusively Type 1 diabetes and that Type 2 diabetes very rarely affected the young. Sadly, this is no longer true. As the spread of 'westernized' lifestyles gives rise to a steep increase in rates of obesity worldwide, Type 2 diabetes is rapidly emerging among children and adolescents.

Fighting fat: with TAF in Singapore

In 1992, the Singapore government noted that the obesity prevalence among schoolchildren was 14%. Singapore's population has a relatively high prevalence of diabetes, at 9.2%. Rates of obesity and overweight are high – 6% of the adult population has a body mass index (BMI) of more than 30 kg/m2, and around 25% have a BMI above 25 kg/m2. Recent years have also seen the increasing appearance of young onset Type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose

Going down: lipids and all that cholesterol

Diabetes prevention takes many forms. Other articles in this issue of Diabetes Voice describe primary prevention of Type 2 diabetes (the diabetes of obesity and Western lifestyles), while secondary prevention is the use of lifestyle

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