Prevention and screening

English

The obesity campaign view of diabetes prevention

Obesity is an epidemic accelerating out of control. It is the driving force behind an equally dramatic explosion of Type 2 diabetes, both in adults and now alarmingly among children. Clearly, strategies aimed at improving the prevention and management of obesity must be developed. Not confined to affluent nations, the obesity epidemic imposes a double burden on countries where people are still struggling to overcome generations of chronic undernutrition. Economic progress in developing countries heralds changes in

Identifying the risk factors: diabetes in Asian Indians

As prevalence of diabetes increases globally, developing countries such as India face the massive burden of a diabetes epidemic in the urban population. Migrant Asians from the Indian subcontinent are known to have a higher prevalence of Type 2 diabetes than the host populations and other migrant ethnic groups. Studies conducted in several Asian countries in the last decade highlighted a rising prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in the urban population. The prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is also on the rise, indicating a possible further increase in diabetes in the future.

The diabetes epidemic in full flight: forecasting the future

Were there warnings that diabetes would become the epidemic of the 21st century? In the early 1970s, Peter Bennett and co-workers reported on the extraordinarily high prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in Pima Native Americans. In 1975, we reported the high rates of diabetes in the Micronesian Nauruans in the Pacific. Similar findings followed in other Pacific and Asian island populations. They all indicated the potential for a future global epidemic.

Diabetes Action Now: WHO and IDF working together to raise awareness worldwide

Even among policy makers at an international and national level, awareness about the public health and clinical importance of diabetes remains low. Diabetes is widely perceived as a condition of low importance to the poorer populations in the world. In the low- and middle-income countries, the impact of diabetes is largely unrecognized. Yet the world is facing a dramatic rise in diabetes prevalence, most of which will occur in the low- and middle-income countries.

Prevention comes of age

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

Collaboration to support prevention

President's editorial

Anaemia: a silent complication of diabetes

Tiredness and lethargy are associated with diabetes, but are usually due to uncontrolled blood glucose (sugar) levels. However there may be other causes of tiredness as in the rest of the population, and these include anaemia. Awareness of anaemia in diabetes is low, both among patients and health-care professionals. Yet if anaemia is diagnosed and corrected, the result can be a major change in quality of life. One cause of anaemia in people with diabetes is kidney disease.

Prevention and diabetic kidney disease

Diabetic kidney disease (nephropathy) is a major cause of death in people with diabetes. It affects about one-third of people with the condition. Recent studies have demonstrated that the onset and course of diabetic nephropathy can be improved very significantly by several kinds of intervention. However, these interventions have their greatest impact if made before or very early in the course of the development

Management of early diabetic nephropathy

The number of people with diabetes is increasing worldwide mainly because of an increase in Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is now the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Western countries. Diabetic kidney disease (nephropathy) has been reported to occur in 25-40% of people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes, especially those with kidney complications, also face an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Screening and diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy

Screening for diabetic kidney disease (nephropathy) or its earlier stage, microalbuminuria, is important. The person with diabetes and the carer both need to know with absolute certainty whether nephropathy is developing. They need to know because it is possible to prevent or at

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