Prevention and screening

English

Anaemia: a silent complication of diabetes

Tiredness and lethargy are associated with diabetes, but are usually due to uncontrolled blood glucose (sugar) levels. However there may be other causes of tiredness as in the rest of the population, and these include anaemia. Awareness of anaemia in diabetes is low, both among patients and health-care professionals. Yet if anaemia is diagnosed and corrected, the result can be a major change in quality of life. One cause of anaemia in people with diabetes is kidney disease.

Prevention and diabetic kidney disease

Diabetic kidney disease (nephropathy) is a major cause of death in people with diabetes. It affects about one-third of people with the condition. Recent studies have demonstrated that the onset and course of diabetic nephropathy can be improved very significantly by several kinds of intervention. However, these interventions have their greatest impact if made before or very early in the course of the development

Management of early diabetic nephropathy

The number of people with diabetes is increasing worldwide mainly because of an increase in Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is now the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Western countries. Diabetic kidney disease (nephropathy) has been reported to occur in 25-40% of people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes, especially those with kidney complications, also face an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Screening and diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy

Screening for diabetic kidney disease (nephropathy) or its earlier stage, microalbuminuria, is important. The person with diabetes and the carer both need to know with absolute certainty whether nephropathy is developing. They need to know because it is possible to prevent or at

Dentistry in diabetes diagnosis and management

Much attention is given to heart disease, nerve damage, kidney disease, and eye damage which can develop in people with diabetes. However, the mouth (oral) health complications associated with diabetes are often overlooked. In order to diagnose the potential presence of oral complications, it is very important for people with diabetes to have dental examinations at least every 6 months. In this article, Martin Gillis and Steven Saxon look at the oral health of people with diabetes with regard to the oral symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes, the oral health

Staged Diabetes Management: improving diabetes care worldwide

Diabetes and the disorders associated with diabetes currently affect one billion people world wide. Surprisingly, specialists care for less than 2% of people with diabetes and its related disorders. General practitioners constitute the principal care providers for almost all of these people. The majority of these health professionals serve in an environment with very limited resources. Nevertheless, within such health-care systems, these resources can be optimized, and evidence-based medicine can be practised. Roger S Mazze reports on the potential improvements to

Improved diabetes management in South Africa: the case for a capitation model

About 43 million people live in the Republic of South Africa. Approximately 80% of these receive government-sponsored medical care, and 20% receive medical care in the private sector – paid for either by themselves or by medical insurance schemes. The costs of diabetes management are considerable, both for the person with the condition and the health-care provider. These costs relate to the management of the condition and the treatment of short- and long-term diabetes

A year of concentration on kidneys

President's editorial

To promote diabetes care, prevention and a cure worldwide

President's editorial

World Diabetes Day: a holistic approach to raising awareness

World Diabetes Day (WDD) is the focus of the principal global awareness campaign of the diabetes world. The events of 14 November widely contribute to raising awareness of the considerable human and societal costs of a health condition which, despite affecting around 200 million people around the world, is often inadequately addressed or indeed ignored. In this article, Lorenzo Piemonte reports on the growing significance of this key date in the diabetes calendar.

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