Prevention and screening


Agents for change: champions in the fight against diabetes in South Africa

The potential threat from type 2 diabetes in  South Africa remains dangerously underestimated and its current prevalence widely unrecognized. Yet the problem is growing at an alarming rate. A series of factors that are particular to the region represent enormous obstacles to an effective response by people with the condition, healthcare providers and wider society. In this article, Noy Pullen identifies some of the key socio-economic, environmental and educational issues affecting rural South Africa.

Asthma, obesity and type 2 diabetes - mechanisms, management and prevention

Obesity, currently a worldwide epidemic, is associated with a number of conditions, including coronary artery disease, lipid abnormalities, gallstones, cancer and type 2  diabetes, obstructive sleep apnoea, and obesity hypoventilation. Recently, studies have shown that asthma may also be associated with, and perhaps worsened by, obesity. Ongoing research suggests that type 2 diabetes and asthma may be linked to obesity through chronic systemic inflammation.

Understand diabetes and take control: World Diabetes Day 2009

The World Diabetes Day campaign is led by the International Diabetes Federation and its member associations. Created by the Federation and the World Health Organization in 1991, World Diabetes Day is an official United Nations Day. The campaign draws attention to issues of paramount importance to the diabetes world and keeps diabetes firmly in the public spotlight. The campaign is represented by a blue circle logo that was adopted after the passage of the United Nations Resolution on diabetes.

The IMAGE project - preventing type 2 diabetes in Europe

The standards for diabetes prevention vary greatly between the EU Member States. By sharing best practices and raising standards in the prevention of type 2 diabetes throughout the EU, the development of the condition in those at risk can be reduced. Major studies have demonstrated that prevention programmes can significantly reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Based on convincing evidence from clinical studies, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) have published recommendations for the prevention of the condition.

From research to the clinic to the home

President's editorial

Improving care and prevention for people with diabetes in Algeria

Like many other developing countries, Algeria is undergoing a transition in its disease  profile. The emergence of non-communicable diseases, including obesity-driven type 2

Synergistic improvements in global health

President's editorial

The global chronic disease burden: what is being done?

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that in 2005, HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria combined were responsible for around 4 million deaths. In the same year, chronic non-communicable diseases killed nearly 30 million people. Shocking as they are, these figures do not tell the full story of the disability, suffering and personal hardship that results from diabetes complications; or, on a larger economic scale, the enormous healthcare costs and lost productivity attributable to diabetes.

Developing a global framework to address non-communicable diseases

Heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer are now among the leading causes of death and disability around the world. The causes of these diseases include modifiable lifestyle-related risk factors, such as smoking, poor diet, lack of physical activity, as well as non-modifiable risk factors, including age and genetics. Due to population growth and the relative success of efforts to reduce communicable diseases, the number of people with non-communicable diseases will continue to rise in the future.

The North Karelia Project: 30 years successfully preventing chronic diseases

After World War II, chronic diseases, cardiovascular diseases in particular, became a major public health problem in industrialized countries. These diseases were perceived as diseases of affluence. Finland was hit hard: in the 1960s, Finland had the world’s highest rate of deaths from coronary heart disease. Middle-aged men were dying in great numbers. The rates were even higher in the east of the country – the highest figures being in the Province of North Karelia.