Prevention and screening

English

Breastfeeding and diabetes - benefits and special needs

Breastfeeding has numerous advantages for mothers with diabetes and their babies. Nursing mothers have lower insulin requirements and better control of their blood glucose; breastfed babies may have a lower risk of developing diabetes themselves. Alison Stuebe describes these potential benefits and highlights the special needs of breastfeeding mothers with diabetes.

Translating science into practice: the US National Diabetes Education Program

The USA ranks third in the global prevalence of diabetes, preceded only by India and China. About 7% of the population has diabetes. A third of the total number of people with the condition is believed to be undiagnosed and therefore not receiving treatment to reduce the risk of disabling and life-threatening diabetes complications. The economic costs of diabetes are enormous – estimated at 132 billion USD in 2002. The mission of the US National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is to reduce diabetes-related illness and death.

Convivencias: a low-cost model for holistic diabetes education

The objective of holiday camps for children and adolescents with diabetes is to create an environment in which they can learn to embrace their condition and its treatment. Achieving and maintaining good blood glucose control is a key aim; the camps provide excellent opportunities for young people to learn and practise diabetes skills and become familiar with the latest techniques.

The IDF consensus on the prevention of type 2 diabetes

Early intervention to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes benefits people who are at high risk of developing the condition in terms of increased life expectancy and quality of life. It also benefits societies and healthcare systems in economic terms. In order to address the growing impact of type 2 diabetes, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Task Force on Prevention and Epidemiology convened a consensus workshop in 2006. Its primary goal was the prevention of type 2 diabetes in developed and developing countries.

Learning the lessons - preventing type 2 diabetes in Nepal

Diabetes has become a significant public health problem in urban Nepal. Studies carried out by the Nepal Diabetes Association in towns and cities throughout the country have revealed a diabetes prevalence of around 15% among people aged 20 years and above, and 19% among people aged 40 years and above. The Association has identified a number of key issues which continue to exacerbate this epidemic in Nepal.

The impact of a low-fat vegan diet on people with type 2 diabetes

Typical diets for people with type 2 diabetes limit carbohydrates, reduce calories to facilitate weight loss, and limit saturated fats to reduce cardiovascular risk. These dietary changes are logical and sometimes helpful. For many people, however, this sort of change leads to no more than modest weight loss and a small improvement in blood glucose control. In this article, Neal Barnard looks at evidence to suggest there might be a more effective nutritional approach to prevent or manage type 2 diabetes.

Growing up safe and sound

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

Lifestyles hold the key to global health

President's editorial

Education and public information: preventing diabetic ketoacidosis in Italy

Left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis has a 100% death rate. Indeed, ketoacidosis is a leading cause of death and disability in children with type 1 diabetes. Severe acidosis often develops during an extended period in which hyperglycaemia-related symptoms are misdiagnosed. Reducing this period may be sufficient to prevent severe acidosis in newly diagnosed children with diabetes.

Preventing type 2 diabetes in children - a role for the whole community

When the author began her career as a paediatric endocrinologist in Los Angeles, USA, 30 years ago, childhood obesity was rare and type 2 diabetes in young people was almost unheard of. Nowadays, however, one in three children in that city is overweight or obese, and a quarter of the children diagnosed with diabetes at her centre have type 2 diabetes. This situation mirrors developments in paediatric health throughout the world; obesity and type 2 diabetes in young people are now regarded as related global epidemics.

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