Prevention and screening

English

Lifestyle and nutritional management

It is often stated that dietary management is a cornerstone of diabetes care. More recently, physical activity has also been recognized as a useful fundamental intervention. When it is realized that both of these can affect a variety of the problems that bedevil people with diabetes – including excess body weight, high blood glucose levels, high blood fat levels, and high blood pressure – it is not difficult to see why these issues might be regarded as fundamental.

Prevention of diabetes and its complications: key goals in Finland

The 10-year National Diabetes Programme in Finland (DEHKO) has been up and running for 6 years. The formal evaluations carried out to date indicate that the Programme continues to have a positive impact in a number of areas of diabetes care in Finland. Moreover, prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications remain the principle objectives of DEHKO. Timo Saaristo and Leena Etu-Seppälä report on FIN-D2D (2003-2007), the DEHKO project to implement primary prevention of type 2 diabetes in five regions – potentially affecting 1.5 million people.

Glucose control: measures, levels and monitoring

Blood glucose control is central to the very nature of diabetes, and the late complications which can develop. Unfortunately, it cannot be sensed by the person with diabetes unless levels are very high or very low. Accordingly, blood glucose control has to be measured reliably, and this needs to be done in the clinic and in normal life. Evidently, the results have then to be related to the risks of developing complications – hence targets and intervention levels.

Diabetes management in a primary care setting: the Kenyatta National Hospital

Diabetes is increasingly common worldwide, and Kenya is no exception. The Ministry of Health estimates the prevalence of diabetes to be around 10% (3.5 million people). The cause of much human suffering, diabetes also places a considerable economic burden on individuals and families, and healthcare systems.

Toward a better future in Morocco

The rise in the number of people with diabetes in Morocco reflects current global trends. In step with the sharp and ongoing increase in levels of obesity in the urban populations, the prevalence of diabetes is rising. But while the threat of a full-blown diabetes epidemic in Morocco is growing, many people with the condition receive inadequate care as a result of shortages in human and medical resources, poor clinical facilities, and a lack of diabetes education.

A diabetes strategy for Africa: investing in health, protecting our people

The burgeoning epidemic of diabetes in Africa will exact a terrible toll from the people and economies of the region. The costs of the condition and its complications are already unacceptably high. Every day in Africa, large numbers of children and adults die because they cannot pay for the insulin they need to survive; many more die before a diagnosis can be made. But diabetes can be controlled through relatively small investments and prevented entirely through simple cost-effective interventions.

The Kahnawake Schools Project: diabetes prevention in the Mohawk community

Type 2 diabetes is at epidemic proportions among Aboriginal people in Canada – around 15% of the Aboriginal population from 15 years and older. During the 1980s, healthcare providers at the local hospital in Kahnawake Mohawk Territory near Montreal, Quebec, noticed high rates of diabetes among people with cardiovascular

The IDF definition: why we need a global consensus

There is a constellation of metabolic abnormalities which includes centrally distributed obesity, decreased levels of HDL cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, high blood pressure, and high blood glucose (hyperglycaemia). This is known as the metabolic syndrome. Associated with a five-fold risk for type 2 diabetes and two- to three-fold increase in risk for cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome is now considered one of the principal public health issues of the

Time to plot a safe course

President's editorial

Preventing non-communicable diseases: an integrated community approach

The drastic rise in childhood obesity worldwide reflects the impact of unhealthy modern lifestyles. Over the last decade and a half, the increase of high-sugar, high-fat processed foods in our diets has combined with sedentary behaviour to radically and negatively affect the health of our societies. Initiatives are urgently required which can reduce the resulting individual and societal burden to physical and psychological health and economic development.

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