Prevention and screening

English

The other global fuel crisis

President's editorial

Obesity: how to respond to a huge challenge

People with obesity have been illustrated by artists throughout our modern cultural history. Who would not recognize the clearly overweight Milon Venus or obese women in paintings by Rubens? These people, however, were rather rare exceptions during times when labour required physical work and food shortage was much more common than in the present. Although we lack specific data, it is likely that the industrial revolution together with improved food hygiene were associated with an increase in the prevalence of obesity at least among those whose labour was physically less demanding.

The next step: the diabetic foot - costs, prevention and future policies

Of all the serious and costly complications affecting individuals with diabetes – heart disease, kidney failure and blindness – foot complications take the greatest toll.

The case for and against screening for type 2 diabetes

The decision to screen for diabetes may seem an easy one to make as the condition is common, expensive, chronic and with a prognosis highly dependent on the correct treatment. On the other hand, there is a general lack of adequate screening tools, lack of knowledge regarding appropriate treatment, uncertainties regarding economic consequences and a total lack of knowledge regarding the psychological consequences of screening. Studies focusing on these issues should, therefore, be performed before systematic screening can be recommended.

Epidemiology, clinical medicine and public health: at the interface

In today’s health-conscious world, ill health is no longer an inexplicable ‘act of God’, nor a punishment for wrong-doing nor an evil spell. The marriage of medicine and science, scarcely a century old, has revealed much about the causes of disease, how to treat it and, increasingly, how to prevent it. This is particularly valid for people with diabetes, a condition which, over the years, has prompted increased understanding and acquisition of knowledge. The disorder has been recognized and described almost since the written human record started.

Setting the standards in England

In England we are currently increasing public spending on health faster than any major country in Europe. But, along with investing more, we need to do things differently. We need to look more radically at how health services are provided within a network of health and social care, shifting the balance between what we do in hospitals and what we do elsewhere. These are the principles that we will apply to modernizing diabetes treatment and that will underpin the ongoing work of the National Service Frameworks (NSF).

Islam, women and diabetes

Islam instructs believers to take care of their health. Prophet Muhammad said, "There are two graces which many people misevaluate; (they are) health and free time (for doing good)". This is why taking care of the body is the foremost duty of the woman as she takes care of all the dietary and health concerns of herself and her family.

Pregnancy and eye disease

Diabetic retinopathy is a disease of the small blood vessels of the retina, which is the lining of the back of the eye that senses light. Several factors contribute to the progression of this complication of diabetes: poor metabolic control, rapidly improved metabolic control, long duration of diabetes, high blood pressure and pregnancy. Pregnancy-induced progression of diabetic retinopathy can be sight-threatening.

The heart of the matter: cardiovascular disease

While pre-menopausal women without diabetes are protected from cardiovascular disease (CVD), women with diabetes lose the protective effect of female sex hormones. Consequently, CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in women with diabetes. However, by knowing and controlling the risk factors for CVD, one can do much to prevent or delay its development—even in this high-risk group.

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: double jeopardy

Diabetes is closely associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), particularly heart attack, stroke and ischaemia of the lower limbs. People with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop these diseases compared to people without the condition. Recent evidence, however, tells us that it is possible to prevent or delay these complications. IDF is very aware of the scale of the problem, and has entered the 21st century with the issue high on its agenda. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease has been selected as the theme for this year’s World Diabetes Day campaign.

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