Prevention and screening


Islam, women and diabetes

Islam instructs believers to take care of their health. Prophet Muhammad said, "There are two graces which many people misevaluate; (they are) health and free time (for doing good)". This is why taking care of the body is the foremost duty of the woman as she takes care of all the dietary and health concerns of herself and her family.

Pregnancy and eye disease

Diabetic retinopathy is a disease of the small blood vessels of the retina, which is the lining of the back of the eye that senses light. Several factors contribute to the progression of this complication of diabetes: poor metabolic control, rapidly improved metabolic control, long duration of diabetes, high blood pressure and pregnancy. Pregnancy-induced progression of diabetic retinopathy can be sight-threatening.

The heart of the matter: cardiovascular disease

While pre-menopausal women without diabetes are protected from cardiovascular disease (CVD), women with diabetes lose the protective effect of female sex hormones. Consequently, CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in women with diabetes. However, by knowing and controlling the risk factors for CVD, one can do much to prevent or delay its development—even in this high-risk group.

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: double jeopardy

Diabetes is closely associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), particularly heart attack, stroke and ischaemia of the lower limbs. People with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop these diseases compared to people without the condition. Recent evidence, however, tells us that it is possible to prevent or delay these complications. IDF is very aware of the scale of the problem, and has entered the 21st century with the issue high on its agenda. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease has been selected as the theme for this year’s World Diabetes Day campaign.

Self-care: an important and cost-effective investment

The elevated cost of diabetes can be seen as the result of all previous failures of treatment. As illustrated in this article, treating diabetes complications is far more expensive than taking preventative measures. Future cost cutting, therefore, can only be achieved by improving the level of care, especially in the field of self-management. People with diabetes must be given the means to do this, which can only be attained by future investment.

The EASD 37th annual meeting in Glasgow

The 37th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) from 9-13 September, hosted by Diabetes UK, was the biggest meeting of the EASD to date. Ten thousand people in total attended the array of satellite symposia, lectures, poster sessions and the exhibition. However, the news of the terrorist attack in New York, shocking to everyone, dampened proceedings and caused logistical chaos for the American delegation. Following is a brief overview of some of the many interesting topics presented at the meeting.

Gestational diabetes: what every mother needs to know

Gestational diabetes is diabetes which is diagnosed when a woman is pregnant. It may have been there before pregnancy without her knowing it, or it may have been brought about by the pregnancy itself. Either way, the woman needs to be as well informed about it as possible, as it can affect both her baby and herself on the short and long term.

Is type 2 diabetes preventable? What the evidence-based guidelines say

Diabetes is the commonest non-communicable disease worldwide. Researchers predict it will increase by around 160% by the year 2025. Sadly, most of this increase will occur in developing countries, which have the least resources to deal with the problem. Even in the most developed countries, health systems are struggling to meet demands for services. In recent years, this has led to a strong focus on prevention research.

Cost-effective approaches to diabetes care and prevention

Diabetes is one of the most costly diseases ever in both human and economic terms. To reduce today's burden and that on future generations, it is in everyone's interest that cost-effective measures to prevent diabetes are identified and implemented. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Task Force on Diabetes Health Economics has just completed a review of the evidence on cost-effective approaches to diabetes care and prevention. The timely publication shows that investment in diabetes care can be a cost-effective use of scarce resources. This article provides a brief summary.

Can we prevent diabetes?

President's editorial