People with diabetes

English

Lack of access to diabetes care in the USA

I am a forty-seven year old white male living in Ypsilanti, Michigan, USA. For most of my life, I have lived in either southeast Michigan or northwest Ohio. I hold a Masters Degree and Bachelors Degree in Geology. For the last 17 years I have been employed in some form or another in the environmental resources divisions of major US car manufacturers. But neither my studies nor my employment record prepared me for the difficulties I have faced and the adversity I continue to endure in attempting to manage my diabetes.

New data, fresh perspectives: Diabetes Atlas, Third Edition

The third edition of the Diabetes Atlas was launched in December 2006, at the 19th World Diabetes Congress of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in Cape Town, South Africa. The aim of the Atlas, which has been described as the flagship publication of IDF, is to provide the most recent and accurate information on diabetes in 2007 and provide estimates of the likely impact of the condition up to 2025. Its purpose is to disseminate the most up-to-date and salient facts concerning the scope, impact and burden of diabetes globally and on a regional and country-by-country basis.

Cape Town 2006: a global event with a focus on Africa and the developing world

When IDF brings together the global diabetes community at a World Diabetes Congress, it does so with a number of key objectives, which include raising overall diabetes awareness, sharing innovative ideas and best practices, and helping to build and consolidate networks – in line with the Federation’s mission to promote care, prevention and a cure for diabetes worldwide.

Variations in risk perception: South Asians living in the UK and their healthcare professionals

Diabetes has become a global health problem, reaching epidemic proportions worldwide with serious implications for health and well-being. The International Diabetes Federation estimates that by 2025, almost 350 million people will have diabetes. People who are most vulnerable to this chronic disease include those living in developing countries, and members of minority ethnic groups and socio-economically disadvantaged people in developed countries.

Celebrating the Resolution

President's Editorial

Staging an effective awareness-raising campaign with limited resources

The Philippines, with a population of 76.5 million, is considered a developing country. Health services are provided by the state through health centres, local clinics and hospitals, as well as private-sector health facilities. While WHO recommends that countries should spend at least 5% of their GNP for health, the Philippines health budget is only around 3.4% of the country’s GNP (264 million USD) – compared with the military’s budget of 566 million USD.

An EU Declaration on diabetes: hopes and expectations

As early as 1989, the St Vincent Declaration warned Europeans of the dangers of ignoring the burgeoning diabetes epidemic. The Declaration called on governments, diabetes organizations and professional societies from countries throughout Europe to unite in efforts to tackle the growing challenge to healthcare in the region. There were high hopes among the European diabetes community that significant action would be taken. But despite the broad stakeholder support for the Declaration’s objectives, significant progress failed to materialize.

The Healthy Beverage Guidelines: a tool to fight obesity

The Beverage Guidance Panel was assembled to provide guidance on the relative benefits and risks for health of various categories of drink. Initiated by the first author of this article, the Panel’s purpose was to attempt to systematically review the literature on beverages and health, and provide guidance to consumers; and to develop a deeper dialogue among the scientific community on beverage consumption patterns. The Panel aimed also to highlight the great potential of changing these as a way to improve health.

Old age, poverty and the chronic disease epidemic in Latin America and the Caribbean

The human population of our planet is aging. According to UN projections, by the middle of this century, the number of elderly people in the world will exceed the number of young people – for the first time in history. This trend started during the last half of the 20th century. Yet policy-makers are only now becoming aware of the gravity of the implications for developing countries of the rapid pace at which our populations are ageing.

An overview of non-medical prescribing: past, present and future

The move towards non-medical prescribing is a process that has evolved over the past 20 years. But some diabetes healthcare professionals continue to question its benefits. In this article, June James looks at the challenges surrounding non-medical prescribing and describes the training required for effective prescribing. The author focuses mainly on work undertaken in the UK but also explores non-medical prescribing in other countries, and the potential impact this might have on diabetes care worldwide.

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