People with diabetes

English

The price of 'progress'? Diabetes in Indigenous Australians

Indigenous Australians have poorer health than the rest of the Australian population; for Aboriginal people, life expectancy is about 20 years less than for the general population. Significantly though, the low expectation of life in Indigenous Australians is less associated with high child mortality, as occurs in many groups in developing countries; the big differences are among young to middle-aged adults.

Can a peer-care model improve diabetes outcomes?

Recent studies have highlighted the importance of good blood glucose control in people with type 2 diabetes and emphasized the importance of reducing cardiovascular risk, particularly in relation to the control of blood pressure. However, achieving this represents a real challenge for people who live with diabetes and those who deliver diabetes care. By way of a response to the need for improved diabetes care, the authors describe plans to initiate a peer-care model in Ireland.

Give the world a shake!

President's editorial

Religion, politics and the diabetic foot in Senegal

Sixty seven-year-old Venerable Karamogo is the spiritual and community leader of a village in the South of Senegal. About nine years after Karamogo was diagnosed with diabetes, a chronic infection developed in his left leg. The surgeons recommended amputation; but this advice was firmly rejected by Karamogo and his family.

Project HOPE Mexico: empowering people to care for themselves and others

If current trends continue, within the next 10 years, a quarter of all people in Mexico will be living with diabetes. Diabetes already affects 12% of the general population and, astonishingly, one in three people over 65 years of age. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and lower-limb amputations. Indeed, in 2004, diabetes was declared the leading cause of death in Mexico due to its link

Providing care for all people with diabetes in the Netherlands

The health system in the Netherlands is set for an overhaul. In January 2006, new health legislation, which includes important reforms in the provision of diabetes care, comes into effect. Having played an important advisory role in the design of this new legislation, the Dutch Diabetes Association (DVN) predicts signifi cant improvements in diabetes care as a result of the reforms. However, not all the stakeholders in diabetes care are happy with the changes, which were the central issue in several national and regional strikes by primary care doctors. As a

Therapeutic diabetes education: the Cuban experience

Cuba is a small island country in the Caribbean with 11 million inhabitants. As in other countries, diabetes is a major challenge to health in Cuba. In order to reduce the health and economic impact of diabetes and improve the quality of life of people with the condition, a country-wide diabetes education programme began development over 30 years ago, linking and promoting optimum care and education. Rosario García and Rolando Suárez report on the achievements of the programme and highlight the central role of diabetes education over three decades of care initiatives in Cuba.

Childhood obesity and type 2 diabetes: a growing public health challenge in UAE

In the oil-exporting Arab countries – Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) – the economic growth and development of the past three decades have been dramatic. This socio-economic progress has brought benefits to many people in the region, such as improved access to health care, education, and safe drinking water. However, economic development has set the scene for the

Improving the quality of life of young people with diabetes in Egypt

In 2000, a group of committed members of the diabetes community in Egypt, including parents of children with the condition and health-care professionals, established ‘Assistance to Youngsters with Diabetes’ (AYD). This is an ambitious project. The ultimate objective of AYD – which recently won the DAWN International Award – is to enhance the quality of life of children with diabetes in

Achieving excellence in diabetes foot care: one step at a time

By the time you finish reading this paragraph, it is likely that at least one person has lost part of a foot or leg through diabetic foot disease. This happens every 30 seconds. An amputation is often preceded by an ulcer; 15% of people with diabetes are affected by a foot ulcer at some time in their life. With the global diabetes population set to rise to 333 million by 2025, there is an urgent need for a co-ordinated preventive clinical response to reduce the impact of the diabetic foot.

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