People with diabetes

English

Plans to stop animal insulin production. Bad news for developing countries

For the West, the availability of animal insulin is a question of freedom of choice. However, it is the only way of survival for a number of people with diabetes in the developing world. Will the plea for help from the people with diabetes in the developing countries, in search of life, go unnoticed, unheard?

"We can control the diabetes on our own"

“We can control the disease on our own” are the words of Muhammad Ali Muhammad Ishaq Mukaddam, Pakistan, an advocate of self-monitoring, who has been on haemodialysis for the last two years.

Children reaching children: the Diabetic Counsellors in Training

The success of the Diabetic Counsellors in Training (CiTs) programme has not only been recognized locally but also internationally. The counsellors presented their programme at last year’s Pan Africa Congress held in Johannesburg and again at the 17th IDF Congress in Mexico City. At both congresses, their presentation received standing ovation. What is this revolutionary and dynamic movement out of Johannesburg, South Africa?

A diabetes voice from Barbados

“My name is Olivia Bayne. I am from the island of Barbados located in the West Indies. I am like the average teenager but with one vital difference. I have had Type 1 diabetes since I was eight years old…”

Decades of diabetes

Hazel Davies and Roy Cross have never met, but they have a lot in common: they are both Australian centenarians, masters of long-term diabetes control. This story is a tribute to them and their astonishing achievement in reaching a ripe age with diabetes—and without complications.

Hypoglycaemia at work: unfounded discrimination?

When firefighter Tim Hoy developed Type 1 diabetes he was immediately placed on 'light duties' pending a medical dismissal. Tim successfully appealed against the decision, but the assumption that the need for self-treatment with insulin, with its associated risk of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar levels), poses a safety risk in the workplace is a recurrent problem. The Edinburgh-based study, funded by Diabetes UK, gathered data from over 243 people with diabetes.

Poverty, stress and unmet needs: life with diabetes in the Gaza Strip

The political and social situation in the Gaza Strip remains tense, with considerable disruption of normal economic and social activity. Such an environment is rarely conducive to the delivery of continuing medical care. In this article Panagiotis Tsapogas, Medical Co-ordinator of the Greek section of Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders) in Gaza, 2002-2003, reports on the difficulties faced by Palestinian people with diabetes in Gaza, and makes a call for the provision of improved diabetes care.

The road to becoming a working mum

Shilpa Verma from India is a mother, a wife, a diabetologist and a clinical researcher. But long before she became all these, she was diagnosed with diabetes.

The impact of diabetes on family life

Children need a healthy mother, not one with incapacitating complications, an unstable character due to the highs and lows of blood glucose levels, or who might endanger them by losing control while having a severe hypoglycaemic reaction. Children need a full-time caregiver. A responsible woman educated to take command of her diabetes can fulfil this role just as well as a woman without diabetes; sometimes even better.

Islam, women and diabetes

Islam instructs believers to take care of their health. Prophet Muhammad said, "There are two graces which many people misevaluate; (they are) health and free time (for doing good)". This is why taking care of the body is the foremost duty of the woman as she takes care of all the dietary and health concerns of herself and her family.

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