People with diabetes

English

Diabetes, fear, and self-loathing: one person's story

When he left home to attend his regular diabetes clinic, Ray Msengana was already feeling unwell. But when he was told that the treatment of his Type 2 diabetes was to change from tablets to insulin therapy, he rapidly felt a lot worse. In this candid account of life with diabetes, Ray Msengana describes the affective impact of the condition, and makes a call for changes in the way diabetes is managed.

Listen to a voice

Listen to the voice of a young girl Lonnie, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 16. Imagine that she is deeply involved in the social security system. She lives with her mother and two siblings in a working class part of a small town. She is at a special school for problematic youth, and her carers are seriously concerned about how she is going to manager her diabetes.

Becoming experts

Increasing the knowledge of people with diabetes gives them motivation and promotes better diabetes control. This, in turn, enhances quality of life and delays, if not totally prevents, the onset of complications. The Danish Diabetes Education Centre, opened in Odense, 1993, does just that, by providing teaching and assistance to people with diabetes and their friends and families. The centre educates over 500 people in total each year.

A dream becomes reality

Palma, Mallorca, 3-8 July, 2001. The VIII European Masters Championships in Swimming, Diving and Open Water Swimming took place. James Foley of the Diabetes Federation of Ireland’s and John Keeler, former Editor of Identity, the Federation’s magazine, were there to take part! James, from Dublin, is 39 years old and has had diabetes for 19 years. I, also of Dublin, am 30 and have had diabetes for 26 years.

Women with diabetes: facing double discrimination?

Being a woman and having diabetes can mean double discrimination for women all over the world. Even more so in many developing countries, where women, whether they have diabetes or not, still have to fight harder than ever to achieve equal rights and equal opportunities. This article, however, will not offer a helpless victim's point of view.

International Diabetes Youth Ambassadors: dreaming, learning, doing

'Dreaming, learning, doing' is the inspirational slogan of the International Diabetes Youth Ambassadors (IDYA). As the former National Youth Advocate for the American Diabetes Association (ADA), Clare Rosenfeld received a multitude of e-mails from young people with diabetes around the world. Some asked for assistance; others for education. All of them shared a dream of one day seeing a cure for diabetes. This dream led Clare to contact Children with Diabetes (CWD), in the hope of creating a global programme to unite these young people.

Diabetes in pets

Diabetes is not unique to people. About 1 in every 500 dogs and about 1 in every 200 cats has diabetes, and as is the case with people, these numbers are increasing. Margarethe Hoenig looks at the symptoms and treatment of diabetes in cats and dogs.

Diabetes in Pakistan

Pakistan is a South-Asian country with a population of approximately 150 million. Diabetes prevalence in Pakistan is high: 12% of people above 25 years of age suffer from the condition and 10% have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). When one considers the associated risk factors present in Pakistani society, the large number of people with diabetes is no surprise. Obesity tops the list.

The cost of kidney disease in India: one person's story

India is fast-becoming the diabetes capital of the world. More than 35.5 million people in India now have diabetes. This figure is likely to rise to 57 million by 2025. This increase, principally in people with Type 2 diabetes, is bringing with it a sharp growth in diabetic complications, including eye disease (retinopathy) and kidney disease (nephropathy). In this report, Ambady Ramachandran describes the costs of diabetes and kidney disease to a person in India

Diabetes education and empowerment: a role for youth

In 1996, American Youth Understanding Diabetes Abroad (AYUDA) was set up by two teenagers after they had witnessed the economic and emotional hardships faced by José Gabriel and other young people living with diabetes in Latin America.They envisioned a youth-led organization that would educate young people with diabetes about diabetes issues, and help empower them to work effectively for positive change. AYUDA is now a growing organization, which campaigns to raise diabetes awareness and promote sustainable development for diabetes communities throughout the world.

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