People with diabetes

English

Guidelines for type 2 diabetes - designed to help newly diagnosed children and adolescents

The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically worldwide with potentially dire consequences to the health of children and to their future. Drs. Warren Lee of Singapore and Stuart Brink of the USA introduce the new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, explaining how the evidence-based recommendations are essential for all physicians involved in the care of children.


W.A.S.H. away the world’s dietary salt

The world’s current dietary salt consumption, more than twice the daily amount recommended, is rubbing the wound of declining public health. Increasing evidence suggests that a high salt intake may directly increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, obesity through soft drink consumption, and many other preventable diseases, including cancers. Restricting dietary salt is even more critical for high-risk populations, such as diabetes.

Debate: How low can you go? The low-down on the low carbohydrate debate in type 1 diabetes nutrition

As a means of representing relevant issues to the diabetes community, Diabetes Voice will be providing a forum in which experts can examine controversial issues and provide an argument supporting their point of view. The low carbohydrate debate marks the first in a series of many more to come.
 

Anthropometric indicators of obesity for identifying cardiometabolic risks in a rural Bangladeshi population – Chandra Diabetes Study

Professor Akhtar Hussain’s aim of studying anthropometric indicators of obesity was to evaluate the predictive ability of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percentages for the presence of cardiometabolic risks—namely type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and the metabolic syndrome.

Voices of type 1 diabetes: doing my best each and every day

Voices of type 1 diabetes is a new Diabetes Voice instalment reflecting the personal burden of diabetes in society. This new series will present individual stories from all over the world and provide an opportunity to appreciate different perspectives about life with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In this first edition, voices from the type 1 diabetes community share their thoughts about every day life beyond diagnosis.
 


Preventing diabetes-related amputations in a developing country – steps in the right direction

In Pakistan, between 4% and 10% of people with diabetes develop a foot ulcer, and more than 10% of those ulcers lead to an amputation. The ‘diabetic foot’ is saddling Pakistan’s already resource-constrained economy with a tremendous and growing cost burden. Significant achievements have been made in preventing diabetes-related foot ulcers and improving foot care throughout the country, including the implementation of a highly effective ‘Step by Step’ programme. Under the auspices of that programme, training is provided for physicians, diabetes educators and foot care assistants.

The world is never enough

There is nothing ordinary about Josu Feijoo, a 47-year-old mountaineer from Vitoria, in the Basque Country – except perhaps that like millions of people around the world he has type 1 diabetes. He lives by his own maxim: the future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams. A glance at his curriculum tells us that Josu has had more than a few dreams, and he has believed in them enough to transform them into reality.

The beating heart of diabetes

At the International Diabetes Federation, we consider ourselves the ‘global voice’ of diabetes - we have done for more than 60 years. We have become an influential advocate for people affected by diabetes, convincing the world’s leaders of the urgent need for concerted action to turn the tables on the world’s chronic disease pandemic.(1,2) Yet our reasons for existing are as they were upon IDF’s inception in 1950. We are driven by the needs of our constituents: people with diabetes.

Supporting research really works – my life after islet transplant therapy

In his own words, Jason Turner learned the hard way that he was not indestructible. Born in edmonton, he lived a fairly typical Canadian middle-class life – a father working outside the home and a mother working inside, a brother and a sister. As happens in so many families, his diagnosis of type 1 diabetes at 11 years of age sent shockwaves through that carefree existence that would continue throughout his life. And as happens to so many people with diabetes, the complexities of managing his condition through adolescence and into adulthood for long periods got the better of him.

Breakthrough – the story of Elizabeth Hughes and the making of a medical miracle

Of the many medical innovations seen in the 20th century, few were so pivotal as the discovery of insulin for the treatment for diabetes. A newly published book, Breakthrough, tells the story of a young girl who should have died as a child but survived to see seven grandchildren, and the drug  that, for millions worldwide, has turned a death sentence into something more like a chronic irritation. A portion of the book’s proceeds is going to IDF ’s Life for a Child Programme.The authors tell us more.


Pages