People with diabetes

English

The beating heart of diabetes

At the International Diabetes Federation, we consider ourselves the ‘global voice’ of diabetes - we have done for more than 60 years. We have become an influential advocate for people affected by diabetes, convincing the world’s leaders of the urgent need for concerted action to turn the tables on the world’s chronic disease pandemic.(1,2) Yet our reasons for existing are as they were upon IDF’s inception in 1950. We are driven by the needs of our constituents: people with diabetes.

Supporting research really works – my life after islet transplant therapy

In his own words, Jason Turner learned the hard way that he was not indestructible. Born in edmonton, he lived a fairly typical Canadian middle-class life – a father working outside the home and a mother working inside, a brother and a sister. As happens in so many families, his diagnosis of type 1 diabetes at 11 years of age sent shockwaves through that carefree existence that would continue throughout his life. And as happens to so many people with diabetes, the complexities of managing his condition through adolescence and into adulthood for long periods got the better of him.

Breakthrough – the story of Elizabeth Hughes and the making of a medical miracle

Of the many medical innovations seen in the 20th century, few were so pivotal as the discovery of insulin for the treatment for diabetes. A newly published book, Breakthrough, tells the story of a young girl who should have died as a child but survived to see seven grandchildren, and the drug  that, for millions worldwide, has turned a death sentence into something more like a chronic irritation. A portion of the book’s proceeds is going to IDF ’s Life for a Child Programme.The authors tell us more.


In the race for a glittering prize – Team Type 1 hits the road

Many people are shocked when I say that my diabetes is a gift – or that I would not take a cure if it were offered to me. But that is the truth. Diabetes is my life; I would not trade it for the world. Because of diabetes, I am healthier today than I would have been without the disease.

Spotlight on an IDF Member: the Dutch Diabetes Association

Like many of its fellows, the Dutch Diabetes Association (DDA) is faced with a growing number of people with diabetes — currently nearly 1 million out of a total population of 16 million people. About 58,000 of these people with diabetes are members of the DDA . In order to support members’ diabetes management, and attract new members, the DDA has developed several Internet-based applications to reach out directly to increasing numbers of people.

Improving Europe's response to diabetes: the Country Assessment of Diabetes Institutions and Services

The International Diabetes Federation European Region (IDF Europe) represents 62 member organizations, which operate in 45 countries, each with a different culture, healthcare system, economic level and political commitment to support diabetes. Developing common positions and supporting certain policy changes at the European level requires thorough knowledge and understanding of each member’s particular circumstances.

This is your IDF - looking back, moving forward

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has led the global diabetes community for 60 years. Founded in Amsterdam, Holland, on 23 September 1950, IDF spent some years in London, UK, before setting up headquarters at its current location in Brussels, Belgium. It has developed into an umbrella organization of around 200 national diabetes associations, representing the interests of the increasing number of people with diabetes and those at risk.

Globalization and the dual burden in sub-Saharan Africa

In sub-Saharan Africa, infectious diseases still cause the majority (69%) of deaths; chronic non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease and cancers, contribute around 25%. But this picture is changing as sub-Saharan Africa undergoes an epidemiological transition with a rapidly increasing chronic non-communicable disease burden.

D-START: supporting innovative translational research projects in developing countries

In the three years since its inception and after two initial rounds of funding, the International Diabetes Federation’s BRIDGES programme has become one of the principal funding initiatives in diabetes worldwide. With the recent announcement of its third round of funding, BRIDGES has consolidated its position in the fast-developing and innovative sector of translational research.

Diabetes at the wheel – the need for safety and fairness under the law

Hypoglycaemia at the wheel is the most common acute risk for drivers with diabetes, and a concern for public road safety. Drivers with diabetes worldwide are subject to special legislation, although the restrictions and requirements vary considerably from one country to another. But are drivers with diabetes really a danger? Are they more likely to provoke an accident than people without the condition? João Manuel Valente Nabais steers us through the related research and reports from Europe on the EU’s latest laws on driving with diabetes.

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