People with diabetes

English

This is your IDF - looking back, moving forward

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has led the global diabetes community for 60 years. Founded in Amsterdam, Holland, on 23 September 1950, IDF spent some years in London, UK, before setting up headquarters at its current location in Brussels, Belgium. It has developed into an umbrella organization of around 200 national diabetes associations, representing the interests of the increasing number of people with diabetes and those at risk.

Globalization and the dual burden in sub-Saharan Africa

In sub-Saharan Africa, infectious diseases still cause the majority (69%) of deaths; chronic non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease and cancers, contribute around 25%. But this picture is changing as sub-Saharan Africa undergoes an epidemiological transition with a rapidly increasing chronic non-communicable disease burden.

D-START: supporting innovative translational research projects in developing countries

In the three years since its inception and after two initial rounds of funding, the International Diabetes Federation’s BRIDGES programme has become one of the principal funding initiatives in diabetes worldwide. With the recent announcement of its third round of funding, BRIDGES has consolidated its position in the fast-developing and innovative sector of translational research.

Diabetes at the wheel – the need for safety and fairness under the law

Hypoglycaemia at the wheel is the most common acute risk for drivers with diabetes, and a concern for public road safety. Drivers with diabetes worldwide are subject to special legislation, although the restrictions and requirements vary considerably from one country to another. But are drivers with diabetes really a danger? Are they more likely to provoke an accident than people without the condition? João Manuel Valente Nabais steers us through the related research and reports from Europe on the EU’s latest laws on driving with diabetes.

Solidarity with Haiti: the global diabetes response

On 12 January 2010, a violent earthquake, measuring 7.0 on the Richter scale, rocked the Haitian capital, Port-au-Prince, and its surroundings. The exact number of victims remains unclear, but the Haitian Government has put the death toll at 230,000 people; 250,000 more were injured and more than 1.5 million reported homeless in the immediate aftermath of the disaster. The Haitian Foundation for Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases (FHADIMAC) launched a major campaign to help all people with diabetes and hypertension in the region. Nancy Larco and René Charles report from Port-au-Prince.

Olympian Kris Freeman - at the top of his game with diabetes

Kris Freeman is arguably the best US cross-country distance skier for a generation. A key member of the US ski team, his absolute commitment is typical of the sporting elite. But he has another side: with three Winter Olympics under his belt, he is the only acknowledged endurance athlete with type 1 diabetes. He describes himself as an ardent spokesperson for diabetes awareness.

The implications of the new Chinese prevalence study

At the end of March 2010, a diabetes prevalence survey attracted the attention of the world’s general media. Diabetes prevalence surveys are not usually terribly exciting to audiences outside the world of epidemiology but the number of people in China estimated to have diabetes now was so large that it took the news world by surprise. The findings of the study have a number of important implications for China and beyond. International Diabetes Federation epidemiologist, David Whiting describes why this study is important and how it adds to our knowledge about the diabetes pandemic.

The importance of a proactive response to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes

People  with  diabetes  face  a  range  of challenges. Having the condition affects all areas of life; a number of psychological and emotional factors are involved. Recently, one of the authors of this article, Robin Wynyard, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The shock of being diagnosed provoked in him and his partner, Sue Shea, negative feelings that included fear, anxiety and uncertainty – a common emotional response which often goes unreported in the related literature.

Peer support in diabetes management - time for a change

Diabetes management involves more than just medical treatment (healthcare providers prescribing insulins and other medications to people with the condition in order to avoid or postpone diabetes complications); it is far more complex. People with diabetes are required to take responsibility, with the help of professional educators, for the day-to-day management of their condition. A major challenge inherent in diabetes management is striving to become a fully participating, active, productive member of society.

Enhancing literacy and life skills among people with diabetes in Argentina

Around 780 million adults worldwide – most of them living in developing countries – are locked into a life of isolation and poverty because they cannot read or write. In people with diabetes, low literacy severely complicates the day-to-day management of their condition or, indeed, entirely precludes effective self-care – in many cases leading to tragic consequences.


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