People with diabetes

English

A case for including peers as providers of diabetes self-management education

Diabetes distinguishes itself from many other chronic conditions because of the complexity of its day-to-day management – both medical management and self-management, which must be carried out by people with diabetes on a sometimes hourly basis. People require self-management education in order to master these complexities. Kate Lorig discusses the complexity of diabetes self-management education, how it is currently delivered, and suggests an effective additional means of offering this education.

Empowerment, education and discipline: implementing a diabetes self-management plan

Nowadays, few people would question the role of a person with diabetes as the central figure in his or her diabetes care team. But ‘patient’ empowerment extends well beyond the concept of self-determination. Diabetes does not occur in a vacuum, but interacts with a variety of emotional states and exists within many cultural and social boundaries. People with diabetes hold the power to manage their condition – not their healthcare providers or their family members.

Taking up the struggle to improve care: a journey with diabetes

During a meeting halfway through a 24-month project for the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), surrounded by well-known health professionals, Barbara Elster was asked her opinion on one of the subjects under discussion. Having expressed her views, she contemplated how she, a person with no formal medical training, had come to be in such esteemed medical company, involved in producing national guidelines on diabetes for the UK Government.

Family-centred education for migrants with diabetes in Scotland

A culturally sensitive, intensive diabetes education service is being delivered in the community to people of ethnic-minority origin living with type 2 diabetes in Lothian, Scotland. Designed by a pharmacist, the initiative began as a research project, but the effectiveness and popularity of the programme resulted in its development and implementation as part of the local diabetes care package.

Redesigning the urban environment to promote physical activity in Southern India

Type 2 diabetes has become the most common metabolic disorder. Its prevalence is growing most rapidly among people in the developing world, primarily due to the rapid demographic and epidemiological changes in these regions. According to IDF, India currently leads the world with an estimated 41 million people with diabetes; this figure is predicted to increase to 66 million by 2025. The diabetes epidemic is more pronounced in urban areas in India, where rates of diabetes are roughly double those in rural areas.

The changing face of coeliac disease: links with other autoimmune disorders

The onset of coeliac disease, together with type 1 diabetes, influences glycaemic control, and more precisely the development of hypoglycaemia. These conditions share a similar genotype. The main problem of coeliac disease is intolerance to gliadin, a gluten protein found in cereals such as wheat, rye and barley; the only treatment is a gluten-free diet. Spomenka Ljubic and Zeljko Metelko report on the growing body of evidence linking coeliac disease and other autoimmune disorders, including type 1 diabetes, and describe recommended procedures for its diagnosis and treatment.

Breastfeeding and diabetes - benefits and special needs

Breastfeeding has numerous advantages for mothers with diabetes and their babies. Nursing mothers have lower insulin requirements and better control of their blood glucose; breastfed babies may have a lower risk of developing diabetes themselves. Alison Stuebe describes these potential benefits and highlights the special needs of breastfeeding mothers with diabetes.

Translating science into practice: the US National Diabetes Education Program

The USA ranks third in the global prevalence of diabetes, preceded only by India and China. About 7% of the population has diabetes. A third of the total number of people with the condition is believed to be undiagnosed and therefore not receiving treatment to reduce the risk of disabling and life-threatening diabetes complications. The economic costs of diabetes are enormous – estimated at 132 billion USD in 2002. The mission of the US National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is to reduce diabetes-related illness and death.

Convivencias: a low-cost model for holistic diabetes education

The objective of holiday camps for children and adolescents with diabetes is to create an environment in which they can learn to embrace their condition and its treatment. Achieving and maintaining good blood glucose control is a key aim; the camps provide excellent opportunities for young people to learn and practise diabetes skills and become familiar with the latest techniques.

Reaching for dreams: enjoying sucessful diabetes management through sports

Despite the wealth of evidence to support the health benefits of physical activity in people with diabetes, many people, when diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, decide to refrain from taking part in sports, and some are even advised to do so by their healthcare provider. When Olympic volleyball player, Bas van de Goor, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, his lack of diabetes knowledge led him to believe he should retire from organized sport.

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