People with diabetes

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Reaching for dreams: enjoying sucessful diabetes management through sports

Despite the wealth of evidence to support the health benefits of physical activity in people with diabetes, many people, when diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, decide to refrain from taking part in sports, and some are even advised to do so by their healthcare provider. When Olympic volleyball player, Bas van de Goor, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, his lack of diabetes knowledge led him to believe he should retire from organized sport.

Motivating, learning and socializing: summer camps for elderly people with diabetes

A conversation with a 70-year-old woman with diabetes gave an endocrinologist working in Belgrade, Serbia, an interesting idea. The patient expressed her desire to go on holiday but was clearly worried about managing her diabetes away from home – without access to familiar healthcare resources. Teodora Beljic recognized the need for some form of holiday facility for older people with diabetes, and decided to explore the feasibility of recreational and educational programmes.

Managing diabetes during Ramadan

Fasting during Ramadan, one of the five pillars of Islam, is an obligatory duty for all healthy adult Muslims. Ramadan, a lunar month, can last for 29 or 30 days, and its timing changes with respect to seasons. Depending on the geographical location

Helping people in times of crisis - mobilizing the power of humanity

Average temperatures are rising due primarily to the release of increased amounts of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases through the burning of fossil fuels. This is provoking other changes, including rising sea levels and changes in rainfall. These changes appear to be increasing the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events – floods, droughts, heat waves, hurricanes, and tornados – which have the potential to provoke large-scale human crises.

The IDF Task Force on Insulin, Test Strips and Other Diabetes Supplies: promoting access to care for everyone with diabetes


Addressing inequalities in access through long-term collaboration

Diabetes is a life-long chronic condition. Herein lies one of the major challenges to addressing global inequalities in diabetes care. The costs of insulin and monitoring are often beyond the resources of people with diabetes or their country’s healthcare system. While it is easier to secure temporary price reductions or short-term financial support in the form of donations or grants than it is to find long-term ongoing support, diabetes needs in most countries are not temporary.

Eli Lilly - our vision: support for all people with diabetes


Diabetes monitoring in developing countries

The latest statistics suggest that in the future the majority of people with diabetes will live in developing countries. There are an estimated 35 million people living with diabetes in India, for example, and it is estimated that this number will rise to more than 73 million by 2025. Sadly, it follows that the majority of people with diabetes complications will come from countries whose health systems are not able to deliver quality diabetes care.

Novo Nordisk: changing diabetes care in the developing world


Global access to and availability of insulin

The first practical use of insulin by Banting and Best in 1921 heralded a medical revolution. Overnight, type 1 diabetes went from being a uniformly fatal disease to a manageable disorder. Thousands of people around the world have received awards for surviving 50 years on insulin – some reaching 80 years. Insulin is classified by WHO as an essential drug. Yet, 85 years after its discovery, untold thousands of people with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes in developing countries die each year because they can neither readily access nor afford insulin.

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