People with diabetes

English

Novo Nordisk: changing diabetes care in the developing world


Global access to and availability of insulin

The first practical use of insulin by Banting and Best in 1921 heralded a medical revolution. Overnight, type 1 diabetes went from being a uniformly fatal disease to a manageable disorder. Thousands of people around the world have received awards for surviving 50 years on insulin – some reaching 80 years. Insulin is classified by WHO as an essential drug. Yet, 85 years after its discovery, untold thousands of people with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes in developing countries die each year because they can neither readily access nor afford insulin.

Keeping insulin cool naturally - the DREAM Trust storage system

DREAM Trust is a non-government organization and registered charity in Nagpur, central India. In this region and indeed throughout the Indian sub-continent and the developing world, covering the medication needs of a child with diabetes requires many families to commit a quarter of their monthly income. The principal objective of DREAM Trust is to respond to these needs by providing insulin, accessories and healthcare free of charge to poor children with type 1 diabetes.

Aftermath of a disaster: an eye-witness account from Sri Lanka

At 7.59 am local time on 26 December 2004, a mighty earthquake rocked the floor of the Indian Ocean just northwest of Sumatra, triggering a series of large and powerful tsunamis that killed nearly a quarter of a million people – 168 000 in Indonesia alone. The tsunami decimated towns and cities from Indonesia, Thailand and the north-western coast of Malaysia to Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka and the Maldives, thousands of kilometres away, and as far as Somalia, Kenya and Tanzania in East Africa.

Lack of access to diabetes care in the USA

I am a forty-seven year old white male living in Ypsilanti, Michigan, USA. For most of my life, I have lived in either southeast Michigan or northwest Ohio. I hold a Masters Degree and Bachelors Degree in Geology. For the last 17 years I have been employed in some form or another in the environmental resources divisions of major US car manufacturers. But neither my studies nor my employment record prepared me for the difficulties I have faced and the adversity I continue to endure in attempting to manage my diabetes.

New data, fresh perspectives: Diabetes Atlas, Third Edition

The third edition of the Diabetes Atlas was launched in December 2006, at the 19th World Diabetes Congress of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in Cape Town, South Africa. The aim of the Atlas, which has been described as the flagship publication of IDF, is to provide the most recent and accurate information on diabetes in 2007 and provide estimates of the likely impact of the condition up to 2025. Its purpose is to disseminate the most up-to-date and salient facts concerning the scope, impact and burden of diabetes globally and on a regional and country-by-country basis.

Cape Town 2006: a global event with a focus on Africa and the developing world

When IDF brings together the global diabetes community at a World Diabetes Congress, it does so with a number of key objectives, which include raising overall diabetes awareness, sharing innovative ideas and best practices, and helping to build and consolidate networks – in line with the Federation’s mission to promote care, prevention and a cure for diabetes worldwide.

Variations in risk perception: South Asians living in the UK and their healthcare professionals

Diabetes has become a global health problem, reaching epidemic proportions worldwide with serious implications for health and well-being. The International Diabetes Federation estimates that by 2025, almost 350 million people will have diabetes. People who are most vulnerable to this chronic disease include those living in developing countries, and members of minority ethnic groups and socio-economically disadvantaged people in developed countries.

Celebrating the Resolution

President's Editorial

Staging an effective awareness-raising campaign with limited resources

The Philippines, with a population of 76.5 million, is considered a developing country. Health services are provided by the state through health centres, local clinics and hospitals, as well as private-sector health facilities. While WHO recommends that countries should spend at least 5% of their GNP for health, the Philippines health budget is only around 3.4% of the country’s GNP (264 million USD) – compared with the military’s budget of 566 million USD.

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