Diabetes treatment > Latest advances

English

The changing face of coeliac disease: links with other autoimmune disorders

The onset of coeliac disease, together with type 1 diabetes, influences glycaemic control, and more precisely the development of hypoglycaemia. These conditions share a similar genotype. The main problem of coeliac disease is intolerance to gliadin, a gluten protein found in cereals such as wheat, rye and barley; the only treatment is a gluten-free diet. Spomenka Ljubic and Zeljko Metelko report on the growing body of evidence linking coeliac disease and other autoimmune disorders, including type 1 diabetes, and describe recommended procedures for its diagnosis and treatment.

Cape Town 2006: a global event with a focus on Africa and the developing world

When IDF brings together the global diabetes community at a World Diabetes Congress, it does so with a number of key objectives, which include raising overall diabetes awareness, sharing innovative ideas and best practices, and helping to build and consolidate networks – in line with the Federation’s mission to promote care, prevention and a cure for diabetes worldwide.

The IDF Education Foundation: promoting excellence in diabetes care

The IDF Education Foundation was established in 1992 during the IDF Presidency of Wendell Mayes Jr. The Foundation is a practical benevolent initiative which, since its inception, has functioned exclusively in support of people with diabetes in developing regions. These countries constitute the bulk of the IDF membership; 60% of Member Associations are in countries with an annual GDP of less than 3500 USD per capita.

Continuous glucose monitoring: overcoming the obstacles

Systems that allow people with diabetes to continuously monitor glucose changes over a period of several days are now available and new models with advanced features will soon follow. These systems require the insertion of a needle or a catheter into the fatty tissue under a person’s skin. But people with diabetes look forward to the introduction of a non-invasive system – one which does not penetrate their skin.

Pulmonary insulin: current status

Attempts to develop the lungs as a route for the delivery of insulin began as early as the 1920s. But inhalers that could deliver insulin via the lungs in a clinically viable manner were not developed until the 1990s. The lungs offer a large surface area of 100 m² to 140 m² (roughly the size of a tennis court) for the absorption of inhaled insulin. Moreover, the very thin alveolar-capillary barrier on the surface of the lungs allows for rapid uptake of insulin into the blood, similar to that seen with the rapid-acting insulin analogues – or even faster. Jay Skyler brings us up to date

Managing the diabetic foot: treatment, wound care and offloading techniques

Foot ulcers are caused by an imbalance between excessive pressure on the sole of the foot and repetitive stress from walking. It does not take much pressure to provoke an ulcer, so the skin has a built-in protection system. Normally, harmful pressure or motion against the skin will set off a protective pain alarm. Unfortunately, in people with diabetes nerve damage (neuropathy), this pressure goes undetected and can cause serious injury. Having lost the ‘gift of pain’, people with diabetes neuropathy often do not notice the problem until an ulcer has formed.

The endocannabinoid system: linking body weight, metabolic disorders and tobacco dependence

Treatment with the newly developed drug rimonabant has been found to help to reduce body weight and improve cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. It has also been shown to help smokers to stop using tobacco without the weight gain often associated with cessation. Beat Lutz reports on the recently discovered body system that links obesity, metabolic disorders and smoking, and the potential of rimonabant as a therapeutic option to tackle these multiple cardiovascular risk factors.

The standardization of glycated haemoglobin: is it desirable?

The measurement of glycated haemoglobin (as HbA1c ) is central to diabetes care. This is the measure by which health-care providers can relate blood glucose control to the risk of complications, such as eye damage or kidney failure. However, a lack of standardization in the methods used to measure glycated haemoglobin has produced wide variations among results and is among the current

Diabetes 'vaccines': can an injection prevent diabetes?

Since the first vaccine, when Edward Jenner in England used an extract of cow pox to prevent small pox, vaccines have become a part of most people’s life. Many millions of people have received a vaccine of some kind – in most cases, many

Steps in the right direction

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

Pages