Empowerment and self-management

English

Empowerment: a matter of choice

There has been an enormous change over the last 30 years in diabetes care and education in Germany and most of Western Europe. Nowadays, feelings of frustration have decreased for both healthcare professionals and people with diabetes, as it is finally becoming recognized just who is responsible for what.

Successful self-care: the best sign of empowerment

Editor-in-Chief's editorial

An individual decision

President's editorial

A dream becomes reality

Palma, Mallorca, 3-8 July, 2001. The VIII European Masters Championships in Swimming, Diving and Open Water Swimming took place. James Foley of the Diabetes Federation of Ireland’s and John Keeler, former Editor of Identity, the Federation’s magazine, were there to take part! James, from Dublin, is 39 years old and has had diabetes for 19 years. I, also of Dublin, am 30 and have had diabetes for 26 years.

Cognitive behaviour therapy: how to improve diabetes self-management

'It doesn't matter how hard I try, I'll still get the complications' is a typical example of how some people with diabetes feel when faced with the hardships of self-management and with the difficulty in controlling the condition despite all good intentions. It is, however, possible to escape from these negative feelings and gain renewed confidence in one's ability to manage diabetes, and in the positive impact of treatment on one's well-being, thanks to CBT – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy.

Future directions in diabetes care: how soon is now?

The science of diabetes is experiencing dramatic change and the implications for everyone affected by diabetes are enormous. We have good grounds for optimism and real expectations of a 'cure' for Type 1 diabetes in the longer term. This future would release us from the drudgery and risks of living with diabetes, and from the discrimination and social difficulties that go with it. Yet esoteric scientific advances are only part of the story. Each advance precedes the resulting improvements in treatment by many years, and in most parts of the world will seem irrelevant.

First regional EMME camp for children with diabetes

Summer camps provide an opportunity for children with diabetes to learn more about their condition in a safe and caring environment. Under the supervision of a dedicated staff, an enjoyable, well-structured educational programme of activities makes for a truly worthwhile event. This article reports on the experience of the first Eastern Mediterranean and Middle Eastern (EMME) regional camp.

Better product information: is direct advertising the answer?

In the last few years, there has been an important but little-publicized

Awareness and education in Egypt: the DELTA project

Egypt and some of the Gulf countries have among the highest prevalence rates of diabetes in the world, notably Type 2 diabetes. Changes in socio-economic patterns, relatively rapid urbanization, and a 'fast-food culture' are taking their toll. In Egypt and the Gulf region, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is now a major health problem, and high blood cholesterol levels and hypertension are recognized as 'silent killers'. However, there is relatively little awareness of the serious threat to health presented by diabetes, or its role in causing CVD.

Diabetes education and empowerment: a role for youth

In 1996, American Youth Understanding Diabetes Abroad (AYUDA) was set up by two teenagers after they had witnessed the economic and emotional hardships faced by José Gabriel and other young people living with diabetes in Latin America.They envisioned a youth-led organization that would educate young people with diabetes about diabetes issues, and help empower them to work effectively for positive change. AYUDA is now a growing organization, which campaigns to raise diabetes awareness and promote sustainable development for diabetes communities throughout the world.

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