Empowerment and self-management


Voices of type 1 diabetes: taking type 1 diabetes to school

Taking type 1 diabetes to school is the subject of the second instalment for our Voices of type 1 diabetes series which features first person accounts of people living with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes and their perspectives on managing the conditions in our world today.

Breaking down barriers and living your dreams ... with diabetes

João Valente Nabais, President of the IDF European Region and development lead for the Living with Diabetes Stream, is passionate about the 2013 Melbourne programme. Living with type 1 diabetes since 1981, João has been an active diabetes advocate ever since his youth. This year, LWD delivers a unique opportunity for people to become inspired and work on realising dreams.

Good things come in pairs: the Cambodia-Korea Twinning Project

Professor Bong Yun Cha, Chairman of the Korean Diabetes Association and Dr. Touch Khun, Chief of Diabetology at the Preah Kossamak Hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia report on the exciting partnership reflected in the IDF’s Association Twinning Initiative. Learn how people living with diabetes in Cambodia are getting extra help for better care by virtue of the first and more significantly, the second, Cambodia-Korea Twinning Project.

Guidelines for type 2 diabetes - designed to help newly diagnosed children and adolescents

The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically worldwide with potentially dire consequences to the health of children and to their future. Drs. Warren Lee of Singapore and Stuart Brink of the USA introduce the new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, explaining how the evidence-based recommendations are essential for all physicians involved in the care of children.

W.A.S.H. away the world’s dietary salt

The world’s current dietary salt consumption, more than twice the daily amount recommended, is rubbing the wound of declining public health. Increasing evidence suggests that a high salt intake may directly increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, obesity through soft drink consumption, and many other preventable diseases, including cancers. Restricting dietary salt is even more critical for high-risk populations, such as diabetes.

Debate: How low can you go? The low-down on the low carbohydrate debate in type 1 diabetes nutrition

As a means of representing relevant issues to the diabetes community, Diabetes Voice will be providing a forum in which experts can examine controversial issues and provide an argument supporting their point of view. The low carbohydrate debate marks the first in a series of many more to come.

Voices of type 1 diabetes: doing my best each and every day

Voices of type 1 diabetes is a new Diabetes Voice instalment reflecting the personal burden of diabetes in society. This new series will present individual stories from all over the world and provide an opportunity to appreciate different perspectives about life with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In this first edition, voices from the type 1 diabetes community share their thoughts about every day life beyond diagnosis.

IDF breaking new ground – building bridges around the world

With its latest round of funding complete, the International Diabetes Federation’s translational research programme, BRIDGES, has raised its game again, receiving 57 applications from 32 countries. This round of financial support ensured USD 65,000 per project and was dedicated to short-term projects lasting a maximum two years. Having undergone rigorous screening by recognized experts, nine of the projects were selected and will benefit from financial backing from IDF. Ronan L’Heveder describes the latest innovative projects to quality for BRIDGES funding.

Never say never – implementing DAFNE in Kuwait

There is overwhelming evidence that improving HbA1c reduces the risk of longterm complications and improves quality of life. In Kuwait, however, few people with diabetes reach their target levels and, as a consequence, remain at risk of diabetes complications. Healthcare professionals ask the people in their care to test their blood glucose three or four times a day. Yet in many regions, very few people with diabetes have received education on how to adjust their insulin according to their blood glucose results.

Great results for DAFNE Singapore – next stop, South-East Asia

In November 2010, a pioneering team comprising a nurse educator, a dietitian and an endocrinologist from Singapore General Hospital completed a
DAFNE course and postcourse educator training in Australia, at the OzDAFNE centre, Diabetes Australia-Victoria. This was the first step in a process that successfully took the DAFNE model Singapore. The Clinical Leads for the Singapore initiative describe the experience so far and look to the future and continental development of their growing programme.