Empowerment and self-management

English

Never say never – implementing DAFNE in Kuwait

There is overwhelming evidence that improving HbA1c reduces the risk of longterm complications and improves quality of life. In Kuwait, however, few people with diabetes reach their target levels and, as a consequence, remain at risk of diabetes complications. Healthcare professionals ask the people in their care to test their blood glucose three or four times a day. Yet in many regions, very few people with diabetes have received education on how to adjust their insulin according to their blood glucose results.

Great results for DAFNE Singapore – next stop, South-East Asia

In November 2010, a pioneering team comprising a nurse educator, a dietitian and an endocrinologist from Singapore General Hospital completed a
DAFNE course and postcourse educator training in Australia, at the OzDAFNE centre, Diabetes Australia-Victoria. This was the first step in a process that successfully took the DAFNE model Singapore. The Clinical Leads for the Singapore initiative describe the experience so far and look to the future and continental development of their growing programme.


Olympian Kris Freeman - at the top of his game with diabetes

Kris Freeman is arguably the best US cross-country distance skier for a generation. A key member of the US ski team, his absolute commitment is typical of the sporting elite. But he has another side: with three Winter Olympics under his belt, he is the only acknowledged endurance athlete with type 1 diabetes. He describes himself as an ardent spokesperson for diabetes awareness.

The great awakening

President's editorial

The need for knowledge of self

Editor-in-chief's editorial

Barriers to self-management in people affected by chronic disease

Diabetes healthcare providers are no strangers to the self-management model. Indeed, it could be said that diabetes is the field in which the self-management model has been most thoroughly developed and implemented. The marriage of expert clinical care with self-management by the individual is an ideal union and an increasingly common objective. It is an excellent goal – one that is achievable by many. Yet a number of systematic barriers to self-management exists.

Lessons from the learners - turning hope into action

From time to time, family doctor and chief medical officer Alan Glaseroff interviews panels of people with diabetes in front of an audience of other people with diabetes, medical professionals, diabetes educators and clinical teams. The panel members are people who, having successfully overcome obstacles which at first caused them to struggle with their condition, are willing to share their stories.

Challenges to diabetes self-management in developing countries

In developing countries, financial and human resources are limited despite serious needs and multiple health challenges. More than three-quarters of the people with diabetes worldwide live in developing countries. Between 2000 and 2025, the rise in the number of people with the condition in these countries will be around 170%. In  the developing world, diabetes, like other chronic diseases, is often ignored in terms of healthcare priorities; the focus remains largely on immediate and acute care rather than on prevention.

Self-monitoring of blood glucose for people with type 2 diabetes: the need for better understanding

Diabetes increases a person’s risk of developing multiple health complications. But the risk of these can be significantly reduced by close control of blood glucose. Although directly monitoring glucose levels to inform adjustments in insulin levels is now a proven part of self-management for people with type 1 diabetes, the role of glucose monitoring for people with type 2 diabetes is less well established.

IDF guideline on self-management of blood glucose

In October 2008, the IDF Task Force on Clinical Guidelines, in conjunction with the Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose nternational Working Group, convened a workshop in Amsterdam to address the use of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) in people with type 2 diabetes who are not treated with insulin. The recently published guidelines on the use of SMBG in people with type 2 diabetes were developed based on the findings of that workshop. A summary of the findings and recommendations is provided in this article.

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