Empowerment and self-management

English

Art as a development process for people with a chronic condition

There are various ways to improve people’s capacity to cope with the psychological burden of a chronic condition. A recent programme based on self-expression through painting demonstrated a way of discovering a person’s potential for development and self-efficacy. This report describes the structure and process of a painting workshop programme for people affected by a chronic condition. Attending one or several painting workshops, the participants used the art material to express and give shape to their inner suffering associated with their condition.

The Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative - tackling type 2 diabetes in Canada

In 2005, the Government of Canada provided a renewed investment of 190 million CAD over five years to maintain and enhance the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative. The main goal of the Initiative is to reduce type 2 diabetes and its complications through a range of culturally relevant health promotion and prevention services, delivered by trained health service providers and diabetes workers. Supported by Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative funding, Aboriginal communities across Canada are working to prevent and  manage type 2 diabetes. Amy Bell reports.

Agents for change: champions in the fight against diabetes in South Africa

The potential threat from type 2 diabetes in  South Africa remains dangerously underestimated and its current prevalence widely unrecognized. Yet the problem is growing at an alarming rate. A series of factors that are particular to the region represent enormous obstacles to an effective response by people with the condition, healthcare providers and wider society. In this article, Noy Pullen identifies some of the key socio-economic, environmental and educational issues affecting rural South Africa.

The Sugarman - a simple interactive model for diabetes education

Registered nurse and diabetes educator, Michael Porter, first presented the Sugarman project at a hospital in South Australia and has since used it at events around the country. His aim was to tackle the serious and growing problem of diabetes in the Indigenous population by devising a way to provide diabetes education to adults and children in an enjoyable and interactive way. The Sugarman takes the form of an outline of a body on a large piece of canvas. Participants in the Sugarman sessions carry out activities to learn about glucose metabolism and aspects of the management of diabetes.

The importance of a proactive response to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes

People  with  diabetes  face  a  range  of challenges. Having the condition affects all areas of life; a number of psychological and emotional factors are involved. Recently, one of the authors of this article, Robin Wynyard, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The shock of being diagnosed provoked in him and his partner, Sue Shea, negative feelings that included fear, anxiety and uncertainty – a common emotional response which often goes unreported in the related literature.

'Stomp the Fat' - an effective national weight-reduction campaign

Despite a fall in diabetes prevalence from around 35% in 1975 to 16% in 2004, obesity and non-communicable diseases, including type 2 diabetes, remain the primary threat to health and well-being confronting Nauru in the 21st century. Nauru has few natural resources and, with a population of only 10,000, does not have the critical mass to support manufacturing. Nor, with a tiny land mass of 21 km² and unfavourable topography and soil conditions, can it support farming.

Peer support in diabetes management - time for a change

Diabetes management involves more than just medical treatment (healthcare providers prescribing insulins and other medications to people with the condition in order to avoid or postpone diabetes complications); it is far more complex. People with diabetes are required to take responsibility, with the help of professional educators, for the day-to-day management of their condition. A major challenge inherent in diabetes management is striving to become a fully participating, active, productive member of society.

Peer support and positive results in Germany - repeating success at my Camp D

Recently, for the second time in 2 years, several hundred young people with diabetes were brought together with diabetes educators, diabetologists and employees of Novo Nordisk, in Bad Segeberg, Germany, to attend a diabetes camp that combined education and leisure pursuits with a strong emphasis on peer support. The 700 or so 16- to 25-year-olds from Germany, Austria and Switzerland were supported by 150 experienced diabetes support personnel; 35 diabetologists and psychologists were available at all times to resolve doubts and queries and resolve concerns.

Improving self-efficacy in the search for cost-effective solutions - the Indonesian experience

The burden of diabetes has increased dramatically in most developed countries and in many developing countries. People’s perceptions and knowledge about their diabetes, as well as other psychological factors, are important predictors for the success of diabetes self-management. Indonesia’s population of more than 240 million people faces a wide range of health problems – both communicable and non-communicable diseases – which are placing a huge burden on the country’s healthcare sector.


Enhancing literacy and life skills among people with diabetes in Argentina

Around 780 million adults worldwide – most of them living in developing countries – are locked into a life of isolation and poverty because they cannot read or write. In people with diabetes, low literacy severely complicates the day-to-day management of their condition or, indeed, entirely precludes effective self-care – in many cases leading to tragic consequences.


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