Empowerment and self-management


Peer support in diabetes management - time for a change

Diabetes management involves more than just medical treatment (healthcare providers prescribing insulins and other medications to people with the condition in order to avoid or postpone diabetes complications); it is far more complex. People with diabetes are required to take responsibility, with the help of professional educators, for the day-to-day management of their condition. A major challenge inherent in diabetes management is striving to become a fully participating, active, productive member of society.

Peer support and positive results in Germany - repeating success at my Camp D

Recently, for the second time in 2 years, several hundred young people with diabetes were brought together with diabetes educators, diabetologists and employees of Novo Nordisk, in Bad Segeberg, Germany, to attend a diabetes camp that combined education and leisure pursuits with a strong emphasis on peer support. The 700 or so 16- to 25-year-olds from Germany, Austria and Switzerland were supported by 150 experienced diabetes support personnel; 35 diabetologists and psychologists were available at all times to resolve doubts and queries and resolve concerns.

Improving self-efficacy in the search for cost-effective solutions - the Indonesian experience

The burden of diabetes has increased dramatically in most developed countries and in many developing countries. People’s perceptions and knowledge about their diabetes, as well as other psychological factors, are important predictors for the success of diabetes self-management. Indonesia’s population of more than 240 million people faces a wide range of health problems – both communicable and non-communicable diseases – which are placing a huge burden on the country’s healthcare sector.

Enhancing literacy and life skills among people with diabetes in Argentina

Around 780 million adults worldwide – most of them living in developing countries – are locked into a life of isolation and poverty because they cannot read or write. In people with diabetes, low literacy severely complicates the day-to-day management of their condition or, indeed, entirely precludes effective self-care – in many cases leading to tragic consequences.

Addressing barriers to care in elderly African-American women in rural areas

Diabetes is a major health concern; 246 million people are diagnosed and living with the disease worldwide. The growing global prevalence of type 2 diabetes is correlated with the ongoing rise in obesity. In the USA, where diabetes is the fifth-leading cause of death, the number of people with the condition has tripled in the last 30 years. The number of people with the condition is set to increase in coming years as populations age.

A case for including peers as providers of diabetes self-management education

Diabetes distinguishes itself from many other chronic conditions because of the complexity of its day-to-day management – both medical management and self-management, which must be carried out by people with diabetes on a sometimes hourly basis. People require self-management education in order to master these complexities. Kate Lorig discusses the complexity of diabetes self-management education, how it is currently delivered, and suggests an effective additional means of offering this education.

Empowerment, education and discipline: implementing a diabetes self-management plan

Nowadays, few people would question the role of a person with diabetes as the central figure in his or her diabetes care team. But ‘patient’ empowerment extends well beyond the concept of self-determination. Diabetes does not occur in a vacuum, but interacts with a variety of emotional states and exists within many cultural and social boundaries. People with diabetes hold the power to manage their condition – not their healthcare providers or their family members.

The benefits of diabetes education: better health outcomes through successful self-management

Diabetes is mostly managed by people with the condition. In order to do so effectively, people with diabetes need to acquire and develop a broad base of knowledge and skills, and incorporate lifestyle choices into daily living which facilitate and enhance self-care. Diabetes education is an active process that supports people in building self-management skills, and provides for shared decision making about how best to fit diabetes treatment into daily life.

What is so different about diabetes in children?

While both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes can occur in children and adolescents, the overwhelming majority of people affected by diabetes worldwide are adults. Consequently, the specific needs of children are often overlooked. Type 1 diabetes, the most common chronic disease in children in developed countries, is growing by 5% among pre-school children and by 3% in children and adolescents each year – 70 000 new cases every year in children aged 14 years and younger worldwide.

Diabetes management in a primary care setting: the Kenyatta National Hospital

Diabetes is increasingly common worldwide, and Kenya is no exception. The Ministry of Health estimates the prevalence of diabetes to be around 10% (3.5 million people). The cause of much human suffering, diabetes also places a considerable economic burden on individuals and families, and healthcare systems.