Empowerment and self-management

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Answering the urgent need for diabetes care personnel in northern India

Nobody can single-handedly manage the many and diverse aspects of diabetes. To be effective, diabetes care requires the coordinated input of people with diabetes and a range of healthcare providers, including a diabetes nurse, dietician, psychologist, pharmacist, physiotherapist or podiatrist, among others. Close

Preventing non-communicable diseases: an integrated community approach

The drastic rise in childhood obesity worldwide reflects the impact of unhealthy modern lifestyles. Over the last decade and a half, the increase of high-sugar, high-fat processed foods in our diets has combined with sedentary behaviour to radically and negatively affect the health of our societies. Initiatives are urgently required which can reduce the resulting individual and societal burden to physical and psychological health and economic development.

Can a peer-care model improve diabetes outcomes?

Recent studies have highlighted the importance of good blood glucose control in people with type 2 diabetes and emphasized the importance of reducing cardiovascular risk, particularly in relation to the control of blood pressure. However, achieving this represents a real challenge for people who live with diabetes and those who deliver diabetes care. By way of a response to the need for improved diabetes care, the authors describe plans to initiate a peer-care model in Ireland.

The dietetics of smoking cessation in people with diabetes

Compared to people without the condition, people with diabetes are at increased risk from vascular diseases – including heart attack and stroke. This risk is further increased in people with diabetes who smoke; smokers with the condition should be advised by their health carers to stop smoking as a matter of urgency. But giving up the habit is not easy. Successful cessation requires people to surmount a number of difficulties, including strong physical, psychological and behavioural

Project HOPE Mexico: empowering people to care for themselves and others

If current trends continue, within the next 10 years, a quarter of all people in Mexico will be living with diabetes. Diabetes already affects 12% of the general population and, astonishingly, one in three people over 65 years of age. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and lower-limb amputations. Indeed, in 2004, diabetes was declared the leading cause of death in Mexico due to its link

Therapeutic diabetes education: the Cuban experience

Cuba is a small island country in the Caribbean with 11 million inhabitants. As in other countries, diabetes is a major challenge to health in Cuba. In order to reduce the health and economic impact of diabetes and improve the quality of life of people with the condition, a country-wide diabetes education programme began development over 30 years ago, linking and promoting optimum care and education. Rosario García and Rolando Suárez report on the achievements of the programme and highlight the central role of diabetes education over three decades of care initiatives in Cuba.

Improving the quality of life of young people with diabetes in Egypt

In 2000, a group of committed members of the diabetes community in Egypt, including parents of children with the condition and health-care professionals, established ‘Assistance to Youngsters with Diabetes’ (AYD). This is an ambitious project. The ultimate objective of AYD – which recently won the DAWN International Award – is to enhance the quality of life of children with diabetes in

Gambling with addiction: dangerous beliefs about smoking and diabetes

Smoking among people with diabetes parallels that of the general population. However, compared to non-smokers with diabetes, people with diabetes who smoke have twice the risk of premature death. The risk of complications associated with tobacco use and diabetes in combination are nearly 14 times higher than the risk

Improving psycho-social care: the Indian experience

The number of people with diabetes in the Indian subcontinent has been increasing dramatically: approximately 30-33 million people have diabetes in India and this number could double by 2025. Compared to other ethnic groups, Indians have a high risk of developing diabetes. However, the impact of psycho-social factors related to diabetes care has also contributed to the growing pandemic.

The history of diabetes nutrition therapy: from starvation to evidence-based recommendations

“For forty-eight hours after admission to the hospital the patient is kept on an ordinary diet, to determine the severity of his diabetes. Then he is starved, and no food allowed save whiskey and black coffee. The whiskey is given in the coffee: 1 ounce of whiskey every two hours, from 7am until 7pm. The whiskey is not an essential part of treatment; it merely furnishes a few calories and keeps the patient more comfortable while he is being starved.” Starvation (Allen) Treatment of Diabetes (1915).

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